•          `I'M NOT GOING TO LAY DOWN MY SWORD' CONSUMER ADVOCATE KATHERINE ALBRECHT HAS A HARD SPOT IN HER HEART ...

•          Dr. Katherine Albrecht to Head US Media Relations for Ixquick.com ; Noted privacy expert will help raise awareness for privacy-friendly...

•          Friday: The Nightly News. The Power Of Community Action Against Tyranny With Katherine Albrecht. Plus, A Witness To The Hasting's Debacle...

•          Can the Internet Be Private? Katherine Albrecht Says “Yes.”

•          Extensions of Remarks - TRIBUTE TO KATHERINE ALBRECHT

•          Alex Jones Dubstep

•          Come And Take It

•          Love is Empowerment — The Awe of Liberty

•          More Good News!

•          Ordering a Pizza in the ‘Federal Data Hub’ Future

•          what do i Get out of all this? Awareness of tracking technology rises among consumers, but comfort level doesn't

•          Internet People

•          Google  search engine `not safe'

•          Startpage Search Engine Co-Sponsors International IEEE Tech & Society Symposium ; Company Executive Invited to Present Own Research on...

•          The Privacy Threat, Revelations, and Relevancy

•          AN EASY SALES SYSTEM OR MARK OF THE BEAST?

•          Private Search Engine Startpage Expects Influx of Bing Users

•          An Easy Sales System Or Mark of the Beast?

•          RFIDs track products

•          Dyer County, Tenn., to Vote on Second Amendment Preservation Resolution

•          Commentary: Company Citywatcher has embedded tiny chips in employees to test the devices

•          Privacy-based search engine foils filter

•          PRIVACY ADVOCATE WARNS OF MICROCHIP INVASION

•          The Boston Globe Upgrade Column.

•          RFID President Responds To 'Spychips' Book

•          After all, it's only groceries ... right?

•          Austinites Rally Against Pre-Crime Shooting by APD

•          RFID, LTD. Releases SPYCHIPS Book Rebuttal via Google and eBay

•          Privacy And RFID: Are The Tags Spy Chips?

•          FULL DISCLOSURE.

•          Can IDA's radio frequency plan still be an engine of growth?

•          Monday: The Alex Jones Show. CPS Destroys Yet Another Family As A Young Girl Pays With Her Life For Their Evil Incompetence. Plus, The...

•          Don't fear new bar codes

•          RALLY PROTESTS MICROCHIPS IN DEMENTIA PATIENTS

•          Criminals Want Your Guns: Art

•          As Cities Crumble The U.S. Celebrates British Royalty

•          StartPage and Ixquick Launch Newest Encryption Standards Against Mass Surveillance

•          Ixquick; Startpage, World's #1 Privacy Search Engine, to Launch in Australia

•          Obamacare: Doctors Planning Career Exit

•          StartPage and Ixquick Launch Newest Encryption Standards against Mass Surveillance

•          Startpage, World’s #1 Privacy Search Engine, to Launch in Australia ; Privacy powerhouse goes "down under" to offer private, anonymous...

•          CVS DATA FAULT SHUTS OFF ONLINE SERVICE

•          Proxy-based search engine joins local filter battle

•          RFID: Be Smart, Not Cynical, About Religion

•          StartPage and Ixquick Deploy Newest Encryption Standards against Mass Surveillance

•          StartPage and Ixquick Deploy Newest Encryption Standards against Mass Surveillance

•          StartPage and Ixquick Deploy Newest Encryption Standards against Mass Surveillance

•          Radio ID tags spread waves of anger among privacy activists.

•          StartPage; StartPage and Ixquick Deploy Newest Encryption Standards against Mass Surveillance

•          Startpage to Launch Services in Australia

•          Startpage to Launch Services in Australia

•          A Dream Revered

•          StartPage and Ixquick Deploy Newest Encryption Standards against Mass Surveillance

•          StartPage and Ixquick Deploy Newest Encryption Standards against Mass Surveillance

•          The human micro-chip is it going too far?

•          Shaw's supermarket chain drops loyalty card, says same price available to customers without it

•          Chipping Away at Privacy? The 'Spy Chips' Debate

•          Consumer Group Calls For RFID Protest At Dallas Wal-Mart

•          California Expected To Vote On RFID In Government Documents

•          ALZHEIMER'S CHIP HIGH-TECH SOLUTION FOR ALZHEIMER'S PATIENTS

•          PEOPLE

•          DEL

•          Tesco tests spy chip technology - Tags in packs of razor blades used to track buyers.

•          An article on Nov. 14 about Wal-Mart's collection of data about its customers'...

•          News Briefs

•          Startpage Australia Launches

•          Startpage Australia Debuts

•          State of Mind: The Psychology Of Control Goes Viral

•          Chip ahoy.(VeriChip Corporation)(Brief article)

•          The Player: Privacy activist Albrecht tackles marketers head on

•          SPEND TRENDS EXECUTIVE TECHNOLOGY/GARTNER RETAIL IT AND BUSINESS PRIORITIES SURVEY.

•          SECURITY FLAW DERAILS AN ONLINE CVS SERVICE ; PURCHASE-TRACKING SITE COMPROMISED

•          RFID WITH PRIVACY IN MIND

•          RFID Firm Turns To Google For Pro-RFID Campaign

•          Groups raise privacy concerns over plans for RFID

•          Groups raise privacy concerns over plans for RFID

•          NSA REVELATIONS REFRAME DIGITAL LIFE FOR SOME

•          An eye on the shopping trolley spy.

•          NSA Leaks About Spying Are Scaring Some Americans Away From The Internet

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA surveillance scandal: Revelations changing digital life for some

•          NSA surveillance prompts some users to change online habits

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          Online habits undergoing seismic shift in wake of U.S. spying revelations

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

•          NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

`I'M NOT GOING TO LAY DOWN MY SWORD' CONSUMER ADVOCATE KATHERINE ALBRECHT HAS A HARD SPOT IN HER HEART ... 

 

By TED KEMP. 

1,564 words

1 January 2022

Executive Technology

EXETEC

16

English

Copyright 2004 Fairchild Publications, Inc. All Rights Reserved  

 

`I'M NOT GOING TO LAY DOWN MY SWORD' CONSUMER ADVOCATE KATHERINE ALBRECHT HAS A HARD SPOT IN HER HEART FOR LOYALTY CARDS AND RFID. 

 

Retailers know Katherine Albrecht. Many might say they know her all too well. She is possibly the country's single most vocal privacy advocate and staunchest opponent of technologies that track consumers and their buying habits. In 1999, she founded Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering (CASPIAN) as a grass-roots group opposing loyalty cards, but has since taken aim at other retail initiatives - most notably at item-level RFID tagging. 

 

In an interview with Executive Technology, Albrecht outlined the role she feels she plays for consumers, explained how a self-described free-market libertarian can become a privacy advocate, and pinpointed where RFID technology fits into society's "worst-case scenario." 

 

Do you acknowledge that retailers' ability to track purchases makes them better able to serve customers? 

 

Oh, please. Ask the customers about whether they want it. It's the unilateral decision-making by retailers here that's really the problem. If you ask customers, chances are your customers are going to say, "Hell, no. I don't." It's the unilateral thinking, and the secrecy, and the sneaking around. Don't even get me going on this. I don't buy that one iota. I think that if it is unilateral and it is nonconsensual, then it is wrong. I don't care who supposedly benefits from it. 

 

I was at an industry conference back in June, and I introduced our RFID Right to Know Act of 2003. The whole audience, who were a bunch of pro-RFID executives, practically booed. And one of them got up and said, "You know, you're trying to kill this technology before we even know what it can do. If you tell customers it's there, we won't be able to do it." That's what I'm talking about. That same guy probably is going to turn around and claim that this is for the customer's own good, that he's somehow benefiting the customer. 

 

My opinion is that if you can't tell people what you're doing, you probably shouldn't be doing it, whether it's for their own good or not. It's not up to you to decide what's for your customer's own good. It's up to your customers. 

 

Retailers talk about huge cost savings from RFID technology. Do you really think anything can or should stop a publicly traded company from deploying RFID when its CEO and CFO are charged with cutting costs and enhancing business practices as much as possible? You know, greed is a very powerful motivating factor. The only power I know of that's strong enough to stop greed is even more greed. If it turns out that you can make more money by not implementing RFID, or by at least not irresponsibly implementing RFID, then people will do that. It's the challenge of anyone who would oppose this technology to look at that question. If people choose not to buy a product or patronize a business that deploys RFID irresponsibly, and if that decision to carry out an irresponsible deployment hurts a company, other companies will learn from that. This isn't lip service. This is truly a cornerstone of my work and beliefs. 

 

You identify yourself as a libertarian. Do you favor free markets? 

 

Absolutely. I am a free-market libertarian. That's the part that's surprising to most people. Most people expect anyone working on consumer issues to have a very progressive, almost socialist slant to their other views, and I don't. 

 

Do you see your libertarian philosophy as being at odds with your advocacy for consumer privacy? 

 

Not even slightly. Essentially, the libertarian view is that your right to swing your arm ends where my face begins. I think one of the things libertarians are concerned about is the notion of power, and who wields it, and how, and whether that wielding of power is appropriate. The Founding Fathers of this country were extremely concerned with checks and balances and power. But I think that what makes me a libertarian instead of some other political stripe, in terms of my activism, has to do with the solution we propose. 

 

What solution is that? 

 

Not the solution proposed by most people on the progressive left - which is most people working on consumer issues - which is government legislation, government control. As a libertarian, we're looking for market solutions, not government legislation. This is why, on Caspian's NoCards.org Web site, nowhere will you see on that site any call for legislation to in any way regulate loyalty cards. We call on consumers to become informed. If every consumer who hated supermarket cards stopped shopping at stores that had them, for even a month, those card programs would go "poof." 

 

Consumers have accepted E-ZPass readers and GPS systems. If consumers decided RFID tags were worthwhile - if, in effect, the free market dictated that RFID is OK - would you still object to the technology? 

 

I feel I'm representing the 78% of consumers who, according to AutoID Center internal documents we obtained this summer, object to RFID technology on privacy grounds. At the moment, I feel those consumers need a voice. And that's something that I'm trying to provide for them. And they're writing me volumes of e-mail thanking me for doing it and asking me to do more of it. Now at the moment that I began to feel that change, I probably would no longer present myself as representing the majority of consumers. If it turned out that the majority of American consumers said they wanted RFID, who am I to say they can't have it? On the other hand, I'm not going to lay down my sword and say, "It's a fabulous thing. Now I'll embrace it." 

 

Are you opposed to EPC tags that can be disabled at the point of sale? 

 

A kill tag at the point of sale does absolutely nothing to protect consumers from the surveillance infrastructure in place in retail spaces. That surveillance infrastructure has been a huge focus of mine for several years. That's a big issue that needs to be addressed. What gives retailers the right to think that they can turn their stores into consumer zoos, and turn us into exhibits? 

 

Some people say privacy advocates play fast and loose with the truth, by for example claiming retailers are out to "spy" on people. How do you respond to that? 

 

Most companies looking at RFID deployments are not out to spy on people. What concerns me is that they seem to be unaware that there are other people who are out to spy on people. It's almost the same as if someone said, "Hey, look. I'm handling uranium. This isn't dangerous. Don't worry about it." If you fail to acknowledge the danger of what you're handling, then you're not going to take common-sense precautions to minimize that danger to other people, and you can't be trusted to handle it. 

 

What is it that you fear? Putting the retail industry aside, what's your worst-case scenario with respect to RFID? 

 

Let me start with a little history. People say, about surveillance in society, we're going to be safe if we're all surveilled. I point out that one of the most surveilled societies in history was Stalin's Soviet Union. And were they safe? That was the most deadly regime of the 20th century. The thing that keeps us safe is limiting government power. It's the only thing that has ever kept us safe. To the extent to which we create power, we have an obligation - as descendants of the Founding Fathers and people who have inherited a tremendous legacy of freedom - to keep that power out of the hands of our government. Any government for that matter. 

 

RFID technology is frightening for precisely that reason. Because if it is driven by business interests to become ubiquitous, and surround us in all of our daily activities, and every physical item we interact with, it is not just a possibility, but it is inevitable, I believe, that at some future point that power will be seized. Because that's what power is. It lies like a gem to be seized. It will call out to people to seize it. And at the moment it is seized, it will be unlike any previous seizure of power in all of human history. 

 

This technology, the technologies that we are now playing with as a species, have the potential, if seized, to essentially create a world of no return. It actually does create the possibility of an Orwellian kind of world, where you could not fight the power. 

 

Now am I saying this is happening in the United States now? No. Maybe that scenario won't be painted for hundreds of years. But why would we want to leave that legacy for our descendants? That's my worst scenario. 

 

Document EXETEC0020040116e0110000k

 

 

Dr. Katherine Albrecht to Head US Media Relations for Ixquick.com ; Noted privacy expert will help raise awareness for privacy-friendly search engine

 

537 words

28 January 2022

08:51

Business Wire

BWR

English

(c) 2009  Business Wire. All Rights Reserved.

 

BRUSSELS, Belgium &NEW YORK &ZEIST, Netherlands - (BUSINESS WIRE) - The world's most privacy-friendly search engine, Ixquick.com, announced today that Dr. Katherine Albrecht will head up the company's US media relations and marketing outreach efforts.

 

Dr. Albrecht is a respected expert in the privacy arena, with a decade of experience as a privacy researcher, activist, and frequent media commentator. She is a perhaps best known for her work on privacy issues associated with RFID (radio frequency identification) and retail data collection. Albrecht co-authored the best-selling book "Spychips," and hosts a daily, syndicated radio talk show. Her writings on privacy have appeared in several notable publications, including Scientific American and the Denver University Law Review.

 

"I'm excited to be working with Ixquick because I'm a huge fan of their product," said Albrecht. "Ixquick.com guarantees to delete all search data so it can't be abused by Big Brother bureaucrats and snoopy marketers. I've been using Ixquick as my own search engine for months, and I can't wait to tell others who care about privacy as much as I do."

 

Albrecht is in a good position to spread the word, having granted literally thousands of interviews to radio, print, and television journalists worldwide. Executive Technology Magazine calls her "possibly the country's single most vocal privacy advocate and staunchest opponent of technologies that track consumers," and Wired.com calls her a "PR genius."

 

Albrecht will work from New Hampshire and report to Ixquick CEO Robert Beens at the company's headquarters in the Netherlands. She will be responsible for strategy, execution, and management of all media communications and marketing initiatives in the US.

 

"We are thrilled to have Katherine on board," said Ixquick CEO Robert Beens. "Her knowledge of privacy and her media experience will be a tremendous asset to Ixquick. We are confident that she will do a great job of educating the American public about search engine privacy and how Ixquick.com can help."

 

Albrecht holds a Doctorate in Consumer Education and a Masters in Instructional Technology from Harvard University. She received an undergraduate degree in International Marketing from the University of Southern California, graduating with magna cum laude honors.

 

About Ixquick

 

Ixquick.com is the world's most private search engine, leading the industry with its promise to delete all user IP addresses within 48 hours of collection. The company's innovative privacy policy and stringent data handling practices have been certified by an independent third-party auditor. Ixquick is the first and only search engine to earn the prestigious European Privacy Seal, which is awarded for adherence to exemplary privacy standards.

 

Ixquick is owned by Surfboard Holding BV, a Dutch company. Further information on Ixquick can be found at www.ixquick.com Further information on the EU Privacy Seal can be found at https://www.european-privacy-seal.eu/about-europrise .

 

Document BWR0000020090127e51r00ane

 

 Friday: The Nightly News. The Power Of Community Action Against Tyranny With Katherine Albrecht. Plus, A Witness To The Hasting's Debacle...

Prison Planet, 16:00, 19 July 2013, 141 words, Alex Jones, (English)

Description of video playing:

On The July 19, 2022 Broadcast Of The Infowars Nightly News, We speak with Katherine Albrecht concerning the Hernandez family victory over the RFID chip being used to track students. Plus, we speak with a ...

Document WC45668020130720e97j00003

 

 Can the Internet Be Private? Katherine Albrecht Says “Yes.”

Social Media Today, 12 July 2013, 56 words, MarketMeSuite, (English)

Recently, I had the opportunity to speak with Katherine Albrecht, author, radio host, privacy advocate, Harvard graduate, and VP of Marketing for Ixquick. While you may not have heard of Ixquick, two of their properties are starting to get ...

Document BC06896020130712e97c00001

 

Extensions Of Remarks

Extensions of Remarks - TRIBUTE TO KATHERINE ALBRECHT

 

272 words

7 March 2022

Congressional Record

CNGREC

E256

Volume 159, Issue 33

English

Copyright 2013 DSCS, LLC. All Rights Reserved.  

 

113th Congress - First Session

 

HON. TOM LATHAM

 

of iowa

 

in the house of representatives

 

Thursday, March 7, 2022

 

Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize the achievements of Katherine Albrecht of Johnston for receiving a coveted Fulbright award to study and conduct research abroad this academic year.

 

The Fulbright Program is sponsored by the United States Department of State, Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs. This program is known as America's flagship international exchange program. First established by Congress in 1946, the Fulbright Program has served the purpose of building mutual understanding between American citizens and the rest of the world. Appropriations from the United States Congress, participating foreign governments, and private sector contributions fund the Fulbright Program. The program has exchanged over a quarter of a million people in more than 155 countries, since its inception. Katherine's host country for the 2012-2013 academic year is Poland.

 

To receive a Fulbright award is truly a great honor. Recipients of this award must demonstrate significant leadership potential in their chosen field and are selected on the basis of their academic or professional achievement. The experiences provided by this program ensure that tomorrow's leaders are both knowledgeable about the world and well-rounded.

 

Mr. Speaker, it is a profound honor to represent future leaders like Katherine from the great state of Iowa in the United States Congress. I know my colleagues in the House will join me in congratulating her for receiving this prestigious award. I wish her the best of luck in her studies and future career.

 

Document CNGREC0020130308e93700022

 

 Alex Jones Dubstep

Infowars, 08:30, 20 July 2013, 468 words, Alex Jones Speaks, (English)

Friday: The Nightly News. The Power Of Community Action Against Tyranny With Katherine Albrecht. Plus, A Witness To The Hasting's Debacle Speaks Out.

Document WC56576020130720e97j0000a

 

 Come And Take It

Infowars, 21:21, 21 July 2013, 469 words, Alex Jones Speaks, (English)

Friday: The Nightly News. The Power Of Community Action Against Tyranny With Katherine Albrecht. Plus, A Witness To The Hasting's Debacle Speaks Out.

Document WC56576020130721e97l00005

 

 Love is Empowerment — The Awe of Liberty

Infowars, 08:20, 20 July 2013, 35 words, (English)

Friday: The Nightly News. The Power Of Community Action Against Tyranny With Katherine Albrecht. Plus, A Witness To The Hasting's Debacle Speaks Out.

Document WC56576020130720e97j0000c

 

 More Good News!

LewRockwell.com, 15:00, 17 July 2013, 62 words, Becky Akers, (English)

Congrats to all those who worked to abolish the Orwellian tagging of students in San Antonio’s gulags-sorry, public schools. The Rutherford Institute led the charge, but a friend and fan of Katherine Albrecht’s radio show tells me Ms. ...

Document WC46502020130718e97h0000c

 

 Ordering a Pizza in the ‘Federal Data Hub’ Future

Infowars, 08:04, 22 July 2013, 503 words, Alex Jones Speaks, (English)

Sunday: The Alex Jones Show. Pastor Manning Reveals The Cold Hard Truth Behind The Trayvon Martin Controversy. Plus, The Obamacare Data Hub Creates A Digital Prison For All Americans.

Document WC56576020130722e97l0000a

 

 

Smart Stories

what do i Get out of all this? Awareness of tracking technology rises among consumers, but comfort level doesn't  

 

Katherine Albrecht

482 words

1 June 2022

Advertising Age

ADVAGE

11

English

(c) 2005 Crain Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.  

 

Opposed: Katherine Albrecht leads a crusade against radio frequency ID chips.  

 

Nearly two years after abandoning testing of radio-frequency-identification chips on products amid negative publicity about videotaping people at store shelves and industry plans to "pacify" opposition, Gillette Co. executives still can't stop talking about putting RFID on razor packages. But consumers still aren't sold, and it's not clear they ever will be.  

 

Wal-Mart Stores ended a Boston-area test of Gillette's Smart Shelf in August 2003, the same week Katherine Albrecht, organizer of Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering uncovered files stored on a Web site of an industry-backed group behind the technology.  

 

They showed research conducted in 2002 by Procter & Gamble Co. that said 78% of consumers were concerned about the privacy implications. Documents also showed plans to depict RFID chips as no more than "an improved barcode" and garner acceptance by getting the Department of Homeland Security, friendly journalists and advocates for the disabled.  

 

Wal-Mart withdrew from item-level tests to concentrate on tracking cases and pallets in the supply chain, it said. But the retailer and P&G got a black eye a few months later when a disgruntled ex-P&G worker leaked news of another test using a Webcam at a cosmetics display in an Oklahoma store to the Chicago Sun-Times. Since then, both public discussion and store-level testing of item-level RFID appear to have ended.  

 

But Gillette still can't help touting its Smart Shelf. In a private presentation for investors at its Retail Innovation Lab in March, Dick Cantwell, the Gillette VP in charge of RFID, touted, among other things, the ability to capture video footage and alerting store security when someone takes three or more packs of razors off the shelf.  

 

"It's pie in the sky," said a Gillette spokesman of the item-level discussion, a transcript of which was disclosed in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. It won't be economical to use RFID that way for "at least a decade," he said.  

 

But market-research firms Big Research and Artafact, with an 8,500-member panel to track attitudes, found that while RFID awareness rose from 25% to 41% between September and March, acceptance didn't budge. The firms found 65% of men and 70% of women very or somewhat concerned about privacy implications.  

 

People don't care much about privacy in applications like ski-lift tickets or tollbooths because they see benefits and know when they're getting tagged, said Linda Stegeman, president of Artafact. "Where their privacy concerns surface is where they can't see a benefit for themselves, which is primarily the retail applications."  

 

Document ADVAGE0020050611e1610000d

 

Internet People

 

33 words

30 January 2022

Warren's Washington Internet Daily

WWID

Volume 10; Issue 19

English

(c) Copyright 2009 Warren Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  

 

Privacy activist and commentator Katherine Albrecht becomes U.S. spokeswoman for Ixquick.com, a metasearch company that stresses privacy... Robert Babayi, ex- Motorola, joins Venable law firm's intellectual-property group.

 

Document WWID000020090131e51u0000e

 

 

Features

Google search engine `not safe'

 

Karen Dearne   

665 words

15 June 2022

The Australian

AUSTLN

1 - All-round Country

20

English

Copyright 2010 News Ltd. All Rights Reserved   

 

AUSTRALIANS should consider switching search engines because Google is no longer a safe option, according to US anti-surveillance technology activist Katherine Albrecht.

 

Dr Albrecht was in Sydney to launch Startpage Australia, a local version of the popular privacy-protective Startpage (formerly Ixquick), that has been operating out of the Netherlands for more than a decade.

 

Startpage allows users to anonymously search the internet across nine global and local engines including Yahoo, Bing, Anzwers and Bigroo.

 

Searching is anonymised through secure SSL encryption and a proxy service.

 

User privacy is further protected because it does not record IP addresses or use tracking cookies that link search queries back to individual users.

 

Dutch law requires Startpage to delete all search records.

 

Dr Albrecht discovered Startpage when challenged to come up with a privacy-friendly alternative to Google.

 

``The last straw was its Flu Map, and the realisation the company was watching back,'' she said.

 

``Google has amassed, without any of us realising it, the largest dossier of information ever put together on individuals in the history of humanity, and that's a shocking thought.

 

``And they could have the best intentions in the world, but common sense tells you that if you want to protect people's data you don't hang on to it.''

 

She joined Startpage as marketing manager.

 

Dr Albrecht earned a doctorate for her research into retailers' use of shopper data collected from loyalty card schemes.

 

``To stand in supermarket doorways and ask people to do a five-minute voluntary and anonymous survey, I had to prove I was not violating anyone's privacy,'' she said.

 

``But marketing people see themselves as entitled to get into our heads, to spy on us or use trickery to find out what we're doing.''

 

Dr Albrecht came to prominence over her campaign against the use of radio-frequency identification chips in clothing that allowed shops to match customers to previous purchases.

 

Then she campaigned against the push by radio frequency identity tag vendor VeriChip to implant chips in people for things such as medical records, tracking prisoners, club entry and even to identify missing children.

 

Now she is concerned by the ``enormity of what Google has done'' in taking people's innocent behaviour in searching for information about rashes and restaurants and ``turning that into marketing data''.

 

More worrying, she says, is the fear people may fall victim to Google-held data that is turned over to governments under anti-terror provisions.

 

``Google's chief executive Eric Schmidt has essentially said if you don't want Google to know what you are searching for, then you shouldn't be searching for it. We are recording it all and if we get a Patriot Act request, we will hand it over,'' she said.

 

``But last year a government agency's information awareness report was leaked, naming a range of people as potential domestic terrorists, including people who voted for third-party candidates in our primaries.''

 

Dr Albrecht said such scenarios went beyond concerns about marketing, to issues of physical risk.

 

``I fear people don't realise the things they are searching for could at some time become a threat to them,'' she said.

 

``If firms have no qualms about turning information over in response to political demands, we're not safe.''

 

Dr Albrecht said the local site was a response to the federal government's plan to introduce mandatory internet filtering against a secret blacklist.

 

``I pray Australians will say they don't want this kind of blocking.''

 

She said using a range of search engines increased the likelihood that blocked sites would remain accessible.

 

``When China told Google to block things, that included Amnesty International,'' she said.

 

``If you were searching for Amnesty within China, you'd have got no results found.

 

``That's the risk we run when we put the world's information into a small number of hands.''

 

AUS-20100615-1-020-323348

 

Document AUSTLN0020100614e66f0002s

 

 

Startpage Search Engine Co-Sponsors International IEEE Tech & Society Symposium ; Company Executive Invited to Present Own Research on Implantable Microchips and Cancer

 

497 words

7 June 2022

23:00

Business Wire

BWR

English

(c) 2010  Business Wire. All Rights Reserved.  

 

NEW YORK - (BUSINESS WIRE) - Startpage (by Ixquick), the world's leading Internet privacy search engine, is proud to announce its sponsorship of the ISTAS 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society, taking place this week in New South Wales, Australia. Startpage is also sponsoring the attendance of privacy expert Dr. Katherine Albrecht, an executive with the company, who has been invited by IEEE to present her research on implantable RFID microchips and cancer.

 

Startpage, a leader in securing privacy and anonymity through its proxy search engine Startpage.com, is keenly concerned with the impact of technology on privacy and civil liberties. The company is supporting ISTAS 2010 as part of its ongoing commitment to an open discussion of these themes.

 

ISTAS is an annual international symposium where the world's leading scientists and thinkers gather to discuss their research and evaluate the societal effects of new technologies. The conference is put on each year by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the world’s largest professional engineering association. This year's event is hosted by the University of Wollongong, in New South Wales, Australia.

 

Startpage VP of Marketing and Media Relations Dr. Katherine Albrecht will be one of the presenters at the conference. Dr. Albrecht holds a doctorate in consumer education from Harvard University and is a bestselling author and leading expert on the social implications of RFID. She was invited to ISTAS 2010 to present her peer-reviewed academic research paper on the subject of animal microchip implants titled “Microchip-Induced Tumors in Laboratory Rodents and Dogs: A Review of the Literature 1990–2006.”

 

The paper is a review of numerous oncology and toxicology research studies in which implanted radio-frequency (RFID) microchip transponders caused cancer in 1% to 10% of implanted laboratory rodents. The implants have been implicated in malignancies in dogs as well.

 

Although Dr. Albrecht's RFID research was conducted independently of her relationship with Startpage, the company took an interest in helping her bring it to light.

 

“In a political climate where human microchip implants may soon be on the table, I look forward to sharing this important research with my colleagues at ISTAS 2010,” said Albrecht. “It was gratifying that after my paper was accepted by the ISTAS steering committee, Startpage immediately offered to not only sponsor my travel and attendance at the Symposium, but to help fund the event itself.”

 

Dr. Albrecht will be in Australia through 9 June, 2010. She will be available to press and media organizations wishing to discuss her RFID research and her work with Startpage.

 

Document BWR0000020100607e667004cq

 

BOOK REVIEWS

The Privacy Threat, Revelations, and Relevancy 

 

Grossman, Wendy M 

1,143 words

1 November 2021

Skeptical Inquirer

SINQ

English

Copyright (c) 2006 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved. 

 

The Privacy Threat, Revelations, and Relevancy WENDY M. GROSSMAN Spychips: How Major Corporations and Governments Plan to Track Your Every Move with RFID. ISBN 1-5955-5020-8. 288 pp. Hardcover, $24.99. 

 

The Spychips Threat: Why Christians Should Resist RFID and Electronic Surveillance. ISBN 1-5955-5021-6. 288 pp. Paperback, $14.99. Both by Katherine Albrecht and Liz Mclntyre, published by Thomas Nelson, Inc., Nashville, Tennessee. 

 

I first heard Katherine Albrecht speak in a session at the 2004 Computers, Freedom, and Privacy conference. She spoke thoughtfully and calmly, detailing years of research and campaigning about supermarket loyalty cards and the coming, considerably greater threat to be posed by Radio Frequency Identification (RFID). She sounded authoritative, reasonable, knowledgeable, and utterly rational even though what she was telling us was increasingly alarming. Then, as we were all leaving, someone asked, "What are you reading these days?" 

 

"I'm reading the Book of Revelations a lot right now." 

 

Pause. Rewind. Question mark. 

 

Radio Frequency Identification is a blanket term for several types of very small computer chips that include tiny antennas. Passive RFID chips get all the power they need to transmit a response from a reader's signal. They can be as small as a postage stamp, and stores such as Wal-Mart use them to assist with inventory control and supply chain management. Currently, they are still made of silicon, but several companies are developing polymer-based versions that can be printed onto packaging. Their life span is unlimited. Semi-passive RFID chips have a tiny battery and are used in environments where passive tags won't be sufficiently reliable. Active RFID tags have an internal power source and therefore can work at longer distances; you find these in road toll systems such as New York's EZ Pass. RFID chips are also being put in payment cards for the public transportation systems of cities such as London and Moscow, in Michelin tires, library checkout systems, the keys to selected Toyota vehicles, identification badges, inventory systems, and American Express blue cards. They help track cattle in Canada. Ultimately, they will replace barcodes. 

 

Of course my reaction to Albrecht's off-the-cuff comment was prejudiced, and also selective: I have never thought about any religious affiliation the scientists inventing RFID and its applications might have. But it seems to me relevant: if someone has been taught a life-long fear of the "mark of the beast," which the Antichrist is supposed to use to exercise power over the Earth, she might be more inclined to see it in a new technology than someone who hadn't. 

 

And in fact, this type of concern does drive Albrecht, according to her own words in The Sfychips Threat, chapter 15, which recounts a conversation with her grandmother in which the latter predicted that a day would come when people would not be allowed to buy or sell unless they "took a mark." Her grandmother made her promise that she would never take one. One day, years later, she found herself standing in line at the supermarket checkout, loyalty card in hand, and realized that the card she was holding was alarmingly close to what her grandmother had predicted: a number that, although not required for all purchases, was required if you wanted a discount. "The grocery card was obviously not the mark of the beast," she and Mclntyre write. But the groundwork was being laid for a comprehensive tracking system. "Loyalty cards and numbered payment systems could pave the way for part of the end times prophecy in the book of Revelation." Some pieces were still missing, they note-and then RFID arrived. 

 

This chapter does not appear in Spychips. Otherwise, the two books are much the same. Spychips has a foreword by science fiction writer and digital activist Bruce Sterling; The Spychips Threat does not. The Spychips Threat's campaigning chapter includes activism via the church; Spychips does not. And so on. Some parts of Spychips are simplified so that, McIntyre says, they may be shared in families. Some scenarios are changed to reflect the audiences' different interests. 

 

The fact that Albrecht is driven by Christian beliefs doesn't change the quality of her research. Her work has attracted the admiration of the worlds leading privacy advocates, and she was recently awarded a PhD from Harvard, for which she wrote a dissertation on supermarket loyalty cards. 

 

Is the threat to privacy as great as she makes out? There is certainly cause for concern. Take, for example, the proposal to use RPID in United States passports. The State Department's idea is that deploying RFID will speed up processing at airports, since passports can be read automatically as they pass near a machine. Critics, however, have complained that this type of automation will also enable identity theft on a grand scale. In other uses-road tolls, barcodes, payment cards-RFID will make snooping much easier. For example, Albrecht and Mclntyre suggest, you walk into a store wearing RFID-tagged clothing and carrying RFID-tagged identification and store loyalty cards, and the store's readers can identify you, your shopping history, and your credit rating. Not only could the store then offer you differential pricing based on how valuable a customer you are perceived to be, but it could track you as you move around the store. 

 

Because we are at an early stage in RFIDs deployment, it's not clear how much of this will come to pass. Some of Albrecht's scenarios seem unlikely-or untroublesome-to me, for example the suggestion that a reader-equipped pervert could identify what brand of bra a woman was wearing as she walked down the street. But most of it is terribly plausible; I have no trouble believing that retailers would like to be able to identify unprofitable customers and either get rid of them or turn them profitable. 

 

Albrecht and McIntyre send the same message with or without the religious framework; I suppose all authors tailor their ideas to the audience they're addressing. 

 

If someone has been taught a lifelong fear of the "mark of the beast," which the Antichrist is supposed to use to exercise power over the Earth, she might be more inclined to see it in a new technology than someone who hadn't. 

 

Grossman reviews Spychips: How Major Corporations and Governments Plan to Track Your Every Move with RFID by Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre and The Spychips Threat: Why Christians Should Resist RFID and Electronic Surveillance by Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre, 

 

Copyright The Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal (SCICOP) Nov/Dec 2006 | Wendy M. Grossman is founder and former editor of The Skeptic (U.K.) and a freelance technology writer based in London.

 

Document SINQ000020061112e2b10000t

 

C

AN EASY SALES SYSTEM OR MARK OF THE BEAST? 

 

By BARNABY FEDER 

43 words

31 October 2021

The New York Times Abstracts

NYTA

6

English

Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company.  All Rights Reserved.  

 

Spychips, book by Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre, warns that radio tags may evolve into 'mark of the beast' referred to in Book of Revelations; photo (S)  

 

Spychips (Book)

 

Photograph 

 

Document NYTA000020051101e1av000a9

 

 

Private Search Engine Startpage Expects Influx of Bing Users

 

539 words

11 September 2022

05:39

Business Wire

BWR

English

(c) 2012  Business Wire. All Rights Reserved.  

 

Startpage says Microsoft's Toying with Search Engine Results Will "Sting Bing"

 

 

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--September 10, 2012--

 

Startpage.com, The World's Most Private Search Engine, is welcoming Web users upset by revisions to Microsoft's terms of service. Bing has announced new changes that suggest it will alter search results using cloud-based personal information.

 

According to Startpage, Microsoft is claiming unprecedented new powers over user data. Under the old terms, contents of emails sent through its Hotmail service might be used "solely to the extent necessary to provide the service." Starting September 27, Microsoft can pry into Hotmail messages and its other cloud services, such as Skydrive, to profile users and deliver them targeted advertising -- even change the search results they receive.

 

Startpage spokesperson Dr. Katherine Albrecht denounced Microsoft's new policies.

 

"Hotmail users will be stunned to learn that their emails are now fair game," she says. "People don't like being spied on and served censored search results. If I send an email to somebody, I don't expect my comments to be reflected in my search results the next day. Email messages should be private and so should search results, and the twain should never meet."

 

Startpage plans to launch a competitor to Hotmail called Startmail early next year. "We want to give our users the security of knowing their email is never read and their search results are not biased or tampered with in any way. We don't collect or store any personal information. Nada, zilch, zero," said Albrecht.

 

The company anticipates Microsoft's changes will ultimately "sting Bing" and drive even more Web users to Startpage and next year, to Startmail.

 

In the last year, Startpage searches have jumped 140 percent, to well over 2 million searches per day. Albrecht correlates the company's impressive growth with the decline of privacy standards at other major search engines.

 

Privacy policy changes go hand-in-hand with search engine censorship, Albrecht notes. She says Web users are not only switching to Startpage for the outstanding privacy policies, but because they receive unbiased, outstanding search results.

 

About Startpage and Dr. Katherine Albrecht

 

Startpage by Ixquick is an award-winning search engine that is third-party certified and fully anonymous. Startpage boasts the best privacy policies on the Internet: No search records stored. No IP addresses recorded. No tracking cookies used.

 

Startpage has earned the coveted EuroPriSe "trust mark" for outstanding privacy and data handling practices. It is also certified by Certified Secure and registered with the Dutch Data Protection Authority.

 

It is the only search engine to offer a free proxy service, and the first to offer SSL encryption. For more information, please see https://www.startpage.com.

 

Dr. Katherine Albrecht is an internationally known consumer advocate, syndicated radio host, bestselling author, and the VP of Marketing for Startpage.com, The World's Most Private Search Engine. Katherine holds a doctorate in Consumer Education from Harvard University.

 

Document BWR0000020120910e89a000iu

 

 

MEDIA TALK

Business/Financial Desk; SECTC

An Easy Sales System Or Mark of the Beast?  

 

By BARNABY FEDER  

320 words

31 October 2021

The New York Times

NYTF

Late Edition - Final

6

English

Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company.  All Rights Reserved.  

 

Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre waste no time informing readers about who the bad guys are in ''Spychips.'' Their book, which briefly cracked Amazon.com's best-seller list for nonfiction when it was published a month ago, is subtitled ''How Major Corporations and Government Plan to Track Your Every Move With RFID.''  

 

Radio frequency identification, or RFID, is used mainly to track goods and is employed in payment systems like E-ZPass toll tags for cars, although some have been implanted into humans. The ''Spychips'' authors suggest that a real spiritual threat is presaged in those implants: RFID may evolve into the ''mark of the beast'' referred to in the Book of Revelation.  

 

That Satanic vision of RFID's potential is confined to a highlighted box toward the end of the 270-page ''Spychips,'' which was published by Thomas Nelson. But Ms. Albrecht has previously made it clear in interviews, videotapes and DVD's sold through religious Web sites like   www.endtimes.com   that the Biblical warning that ''no man might buy or sell, save that he had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of the beast'' looms large in her attack on RFID.  

 

''We're both Christian and it's in the Bible,'' said Ms. McIntyre, when asked if she shared her co-author's concerns.  

 

Convincing Christians that radio tags are a glide path toward the end of days may be a stiff challenge. For example, the Bible specifies that the mark of the beast will appear in the right hand or forehead, both impractical sites for human implants, according to tag vendors like Applied Digital. And as the authors concede in ''Spychips,'' the Bible says the mark is 666 and ''we're not sure how the 666 part fits in.'' BARNABY FEDER  

 

Photo  

 

Document NYTF000020051031e1av0000i

 

 

Letter to the Editor

RFIDs track products 

 

ANN CAVOUKIAN 

Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario

201 words

25 July 2022

The Globe and Mail

GLOB

A14

English

All material copyright Bell Globemedia Publishing Inc. or its licensors. All rights reserved. 

 

Toronto -- The article Who's Watching The Watchers? (July 22) suggests that Katherine Albrecht was invited “back” to brief my office on Radio Frequency Identifiers (RFIDs). I would like to make this perfectly clear — she was never there, nor was she ever invited. Meanwhile, the article's characterization of RFIDs as spy chips is misleading. 

 

Let's have a reality check. Currently in Canada, RFID tags are used in the supply-chain process for inventory control (tracking products, not people), which involves no privacy issues. But in future, if and when RFIDs are embedded into consumer products and linked to personal identifiers, we must remain vigilant to ensure that they are deployed in a manner that does not threaten privacy. 

 

I have been studying RFIDs since 2003 and recently issued RFID privacy guidelines to address the future prospect of item-level, potentially privacy-invasive, RFIDs. I am a fierce protector of privacy but also believe in describing issues fairly and evenly. What we need is public education about this technology rather than fear mongering. 

 

Misrepresenting RFIDs only serves to keep the public in the dark. 

 

Document GLOB000020060725e27p0001t

 

 Dyer County, Tenn., to Vote on Second Amendment Preservation Resolution

Infowars, 06:30, 20 July 2013, 504 words, Kelli Sladick, (English)

Last month, the Dyer County, Tenn., Local Government Committee adopted a resolution to preserve the Second Amendment.

The full county commission will take up the measure in its July meeting.

Document WC56576020130720e97j0000t

 

Commentary: Company Citywatcher has embedded tiny chips in employees to test the devices 

 

433 words

14 February 2022

CBS News: The Osgood File

OSGD

English

(c) Copyright 2006, CBS Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved. 

 

CHARLES OSGOOD reporting: 

 

In what's believed to be the first use of radio frequency identification chips on living humans in the United States, tiny bits of silicon the size of a grain of rice have been embedded under the skin of two workers at a company called CityWatcher who volunteered to test the tagging system that would keep most employees from having access to secured areas. Sean Darks, the CEO of the company had one implanted under his skin, too, to enable him to access secure vaults. Watch out, says privacy advocate Katherine Albrecht, this is the future taking shape if we let it. 

 

Ms. KATHERINE ALBRECHT: Literally hundreds of millions of dollars have been invested already in the infrastructure to create this sort of RFID-tagged world where every physical object on the planet, including us, contains one of these tiny microchips and can be tracked through these reader devices in the environment.  

 

OSGOOD: More on RFIDs after this. 

 

(Announcements) 

 

OSGOOD: Sean Darks of CityWatcher, two of whose employees have volunteered to have RFID chips imbedded in their forearms, says it's not a tracking devise. `It's a passive devise that emits no signal whatsoever, same as a key card,' he says. 

 

But privacy expert Katherine Albrecht says it's too easy to clone electronically. 

 

Ms. ALBRECHT: The problem with using implanted RFID tags or radio frequency devices for security is that there's no way to block someone from picking up that signal. So if you had a handheld reader device and you could get within a couple of inches or a couple of feet of individual with one of these in their arms, you could scan their chip, obtain that number, replicate it and create your own chip and then you would be able to access the same secure area that was originally designed to protect. 

 

OSGOOD: But what's the threat to us all in this technology? 

 

Ms. ALBRECHT: The threat model here though is that the reader devices may ultimately become as commonplace as electrical outlets so that they're literally every place you go and you won't be able to get away from this. 

 

OSGOOD: Even though they can't follow you around, says Albrecht, they can tell who you are as you pass by. 

 

Ms. ALBRECHT: Every time a person passes by a reader device in the environment, it would be possible to scan their chip and identify them. 

 

OSGOOD: THE OSGOOD FILE. Charles Osgood on the CBS Radio network. 

 

Document OSGD000020060215e22e00004

 

 

Information

Privacy-based search engine foils filter

 

Julian Bajkowski  

520 words

7 June 2022

The Australian Financial Review

AFNR

Second

46

English

Copyright 2010. Fairfax Media Management Pty Limited.  

 

The escalating row between federal Communications Minister Stephen Conroy and search giant Google over the government's plans to introduce mandatory internet filtering in Aust­ralia may not seem like an obvious business opportunity, but veteran privacy activist Katherine Albrecht has other ideas.

 

After more than a decade of fighting global technology companies over their development of covert electronic surveillance technologies, ­Albrecht is hoping Australians will embrace a Netherlands-based search engine that can shield personal details from Google and regulators.

 

The new local offering is another blow for the Rudd government's ­controversial internet filter plans ­because it will allow people to easily bypass proposed roadblocks to prohibited content.

 

Dubbed "Startpage", the Dutch search minnow is betting many consumers are fed up with governments, Google and Facebook harvesting their details that there is enough ­demand for an anonymous alternative.

 

A big concern for privacy-sensitive European governments is that companies like Google are legally obliged to provide reams of information on the web activities of their citizens to US intelligence agencies under sweeping counter-terrorism powers such as the US Patriot Act.

 

Privacy regulators in Australia and Europe last month launched multiple investigations into Google's ­admission that its street view service, which has photographed most people's houses in Australia, Western ­Europe and the US, also vacuumed up data from unprotected wireless networks in homes. Google claims its drive-by data sniffing was an accident, but the incident resulted in Conroy launching a blistering attack on the search giant's attitude to privacy during Senate estimates, where he ­accused the company of deliberately spying on people.

 

The minister has emphatically ­denied accusations from the Australian Greens that his comments were intended to divert attention away from technical and legal problems surrounding the government's proposed internet filter legislation.

 

While Albrecht regards the proposed internet filter as scary and draconian she has just as little time for Google's data harvesting and says the company is "much too cosy" with spy agencies and police, who now see the company as a first port of call for snooping and profiling of political dissidents.

 

"Google has the biggest dossier of information ever amassed on human beings in the history of civilisation," Albrecht says. "The KGB and the Stasi did not know that much about the ­citizens of the Soviet Union or East Germany."

 

The key selling point of Startpage is that because it is headquartered in the Netherlands, the private company is legally allowed to instantly delete online personal identifiers, particularly the internet addresses from where a web search originates, unlike providers in the US.

 

This makes the service useless to authorities that now routinely extract information on peoples' online activities under search warrants because there are no records to hand over.

 

Startpage users also have the ­option of encrypting their searches and surfing using SSL, the same ­security technology used by banks to secure online banking sessions.

 

Albrecht is hoping that if consumers embrace pro-privacy alternatives to Google, governments won't need to legislate more controls for the ­internet industry.

 

Document AFNR000020120101e667014zm

 

 

Business

PRIVACY ADVOCATE WARNS OF MICROCHIP INVASION

 

HIAWATHA BRAY

948 words

17 March 2022

The Boston Globe

BSTNGB

THIRD

C.1

English

© 2003 New York Times Company.  Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning.  All Rights Reserved. 

 

Katherine Albrecht has a thing about privacy. That's why the Nashua resident hasn't used a credit card in over two years and only shops at Internet retailers who accept money orders.

 

"There's got to be some degree of private life," Albrecht says. She wants to live her life without having her every action filed in a corporate database. Indeed, Albrecht has founded a privacy lobbying group called CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering).

 

CASPIAN has directed most of its fire at supermarket discount cards, which allow retailers to collect data on your buying habits. Now it's taking aim at a new target - much smaller than a discount card, and in Albrecht's view, a lot more dangerous.

 

The Italian clothing firm Benetton last week said it would begin inserting tiny radio frequency identification chips, or RFIDs, into some of its clothing products. These chips will let the company track a particular sweater or skirt from the factory floor to the shelf of the store. Boston's own Gillette Co. is doing the same with personal grooming items such as Mach 3 Turbo razors. The company recently signed a contract for a half-billion RFID chips, to be provided by the delightfully named Alien Technology Corp. of California.

 

The RFID concept, developed in large part at the Auto-ID Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is seductive in its cleverness. You take a microchip the size of a pinhead and attach an antenna. Embedded on the chip is a product identification number that's drawn from a vast pool of 96-bit numbers.

 

Internet addresses are 32 bits long. There are a total of 4.2 billion such addresses, tops. Moving up to 96 bits gives you a lot more numbers to play with, so many that you can assign a unique code to every single manufactured product - not just an ID code for each car, but a code for each nut and bolt.

 

The chips sell for less than a dime, partly because they don't contain batteries. Instead, you pass a chip within a few feet of a reader, which broadcasts radio waves. This feeble stream of energy provides enough juice for the chip to wake up and radio back. So RFID chips only go on the air when they're near a reader; even then they must be within a few feet in order to work.

 

Albrecht fears that readers will be installed everywhere and connected to databases filled with personal information. Imagine a video screen on a grocery cart, beaming customized ads at you, because it recognized the RFID chip in your shoe.

 

Albrecht even worries that retailers will persuade consumers to install RFID readers in their homes, in exchange for price discounts. Then they'll be able to track your consumption patterns down to the last bottle of milk. Says Albrecht, "You've essentially created a world in which there is no privacy."

 

But Gillette spokesman Paul Fox says his company has no interest in following people home. The real reason for RFID, he says, is that misplaced and stolen inventory costs American companies $70 billion a year.

 

With RFID, companies can know exactly where every item is stored. When fresh merchandise arrives, the warehouse's RFID reader will automatically detect it and log it in. Same thing at the retail store. Gillette is even working on a "smart shelf" that will be tested at a Wal-Mart store in Brockton later this year. Every time somebody carries off a razor, the store's computer deducts it from inventory. If somebody picks up 10, he's probably a shoplifter. So the shelf instructs the store's video system to take a picture of the guy and warns store security.

 

Fox insists this is all Gillette has in mind. "We have no interest in collecting data beyond the shelf," he says.

 

But Albrecht figures RFID is bound to be abused unless it's regulated. She favors legislation requiring that consumers be notified when a product contains an RFID tag. The idea also appears in an RFID Bill of Rights suggested by MIT graduate student Simson Garfinkel. He thinks consumers should also have the right to know any time a device reads data from the tag and a right to have tags permanently switched off. But Garfinkel wants voluntary compliance, not a law.

 

In any case, consumers will have to ask to have each item's chip turned off, every time they go shopping.

 

Kevin Ashton, executive director of the Auto-ID Center, would rather you left them on, however. Say you want to return a defective product. Who needs a receipt? Just scan the chip. If a maker of infant car seats issues a recall, you could scan the chip to learn if your kid's seat is among the defective ones.

 

Still, the retailers and manufacturers are the real beneficiaries of these chips. And there's nothing wrong with that. But what about the rest of us? RFID chips could soon be in our groceries, our medicines, and our clothes. Will we know the chips are there? Will we know how to turn them off? Will we know who's scanning them, and what they're doing with the information?

 

Even those who lack Albrecht's fervent love of privacy would be well advised to start asking these questions. Now.

 

Hiawatha Bray can be reached at bray@globe.com. 

 

HIAWATHA BRAY UPGRADE TECHNOLOGY &INNOVATION

 

Caption: Katherine Albrecht has founded a privacy lobbying group called Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering. / GLOBE STAFF PHOTO / EVAN RICHMAN

 

Document bstngb0020030317dz3h000cg

 

 The Boston Globe Upgrade Column.

 

 By Hiawatha Bray, The Boston Globe.

957 words

17 March 2022

KRTBN Knight-Ridder Tribune Business News: Boston Globe

KRTBN

English

 Copyright (C) 2003 KRTBN Knight Ridder Tribune Business News

 

 Mar. 17-Katherine Albrecht has a thing about privacy. That's why the Nashua resident hasn't used a credit card in over two years and only shops at Internet retailers who accept money orders.

 

 "There's got to be some degree of private life," Albrecht says. She wants to live her life without having her every action filed in a corporate database. Indeed, Albrecht has founded a privacy lobbying group called CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering).

 

 CASPIAN has directed most of its fire at supermarket discount cards, which allow retailers to collect data on your buying habits. Now it's taking aim at a new target - much smaller than a discount card, and in Albrecht's view, a lot more dangerous.

 

 The Italian clothing firm Benetton last week said it would begin inserting tiny radio frequency identification chips, or RFIDs, into some of its clothing products. These chips will let the company track a particular sweater or skirt from the factory floor to the shelf of the store. Boston's own Gillette Co. is doing the same with personal grooming items such as Mach 3 Turbo razors. The company recently signed a contract for a half-billion RFID chips, to be provided by the delightfully named Alien Technology Corp. of California.

 

 The RFID concept, developed in large part at the Auto-ID Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is seductive in its cleverness. You take a microchip the size of a pinhead and attach an antenna. Embedded on the chip is a product identification number that's drawn from a vast pool of 96-bit numbers.

 

 Internet addresses are 32 bits long. There are a total of 4.2 billion such addresses, tops. Moving up to 96 bits gives you a lot more numbers to play with, so many that you can assign a unique code to every single manufactured product - not just an ID code for each car, but a code for each nut and bolt.

 

 The chips sell for less than a dime, partly because they don't contain batteries. Instead, you pass a chip within a few feet of a reader, which broadcasts radio waves. This feeble stream of energy provides enough juice for the chip to wake up and radio back. So RFID chips only go on the air when they're near a reader; even then they must be within a few feet in order to work.

 

 Albrecht fears that readers will be installed everywhere and connected to databases filled with personal information. Imagine a video screen on a grocery cart, beaming customized ads at you, because it recognized the RFID chip in your shoe.

 

 Albrecht even worries that retailers will persuade consumers to install RFID readers in their homes, in exchange for price discounts. Then they'll be able to track your consumption patterns down to the last bottle of milk. Says Albrecht, "You've essentially created a world in which there is no privacy."

 

 But Gillette spokesman Paul Fox says his company has no interest in following people home. The real reason for RFID, he says, is that misplaced and stolen inventory costs American companies $70 billion a year.

 

 With RFID, companies can know exactly where every item is stored. When fresh merchandise arrives, the warehouse's RFID reader will automatically detect it and log it in. Same thing at the retail store. Gillette is even working on a "smart shelf" that will be tested at a Wal-Mart store in Brockton later this year. Every time somebody carries off a razor, the store's computer deducts it from inventory. If somebody picks up 10, he's probably a shoplifter. So the shelf instructs the store's video system to take a picture of the guy and warns store security.

 

 Fox insists this is all Gillette has in mind. "We have no interest in collecting data beyond the shelf," he says.

 

 But Albrecht figures RFID is bound to be abused unless it's regulated. She favors legislation requiring that consumers be notified when a product contains an RFID tag. The idea also appears in an RFID Bill of Rights suggested by MIT graduate student Simson Garfinkel. He thinks consumers should also have the right to know any time a device reads data from the tag and a right to have tags permanently switched off. But Garfinkel wants voluntary compliance, not a law.

 

 In any case, consumers will have to ask to have each item's chip turned off, every time they go shopping.

 

 Kevin Ashton, executive director of the Auto-ID Center, would rather you left them on, however. Say you want to return a defective product. Who needs a receipt? Just scan the chip. If a maker of infant car seats issues a recall, you could scan the chip to learn if your kid's seat is among the defective ones.

 

 Still, the retailers and manufacturers are the real beneficiaries of these chips. And there's nothing wrong with that. But what about the rest of us? RFID chips could soon be in our groceries, our medicines, and our clothes. Will we know the chips are there? Will we know how to turn them off? Will we know who's scanning them, and what they're doing with the information?

 

 Even those who lack Albrecht's fervent love of privacy would be well advised to start asking these questions. Now.

 

 Hiawatha Bray can be reached at bray@globe.com.

 

 

-

 

 

 

To see more of The Boston Globe, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to

https://www.boston.com/globe

 

 

(c) 2003, The Boston Globe. Distributed by Knight Ridder/Tribune Business

News. G,.

 

 

Document krtbn00020030324dz3h004hp

 

RFID President Responds To 'Spychips' Book  

 

245 words

7 November 2021

CMP TechWeb

CMPT

English

(c) 2005 CMP Media Inc.  

 

LONDON — Nicholas Chavez, president of radio frequency identification company RFID Ltd., has published a response to a book called “Spychips”, written by Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre and offered to engage with the two authors for benefit of consumers.  

 

In a statement announcing the publishing of the response Chavez asked Albrecht and McIntyre to participate on an RFID advisory board and offered to help them become "certified" in RFID technology.  

 

In a 24-page document Chavez has attempted to refute arguments made by Albrecht and McIntyre in their book that RFID chip deployment is an invasion of privacy. The publication of the book has sparked off a debate over whether the use of RFID chips by large corporations is part of a conspiracy between big business and government that will ultimately see RFID tags used everywhere.  

 

In a statement issued Monday (Nov. 7) Chavez said he is willing to cooperate with Albrecht and McIntyre to address the interests of consumers and other various parties. “Ms. Albrecht and Ms. McIntyre have accomplished much in garnering the attention of the leaders within the RFID industry,” said Chavez in the statement.  

 

Chavez said he offered the authors an expense-paid invitation to become “certified” in RFID technology and further invites the authors to participate on the advisory board of RFID Ltd. (Denver, Colorado) to better represent consumer privacy concerns.  

 

Chavez's rebuttal text was available here when this story was first published.  

 

Document CMPT000020051108e1b70000w

 

 EDITORIALS

 After all, it's only groceries ... right?

 

 Vin Suprynowicz

1,060 words

30 June 2022

The Las Vegas Review-Journal

LVGS

Final

2D

English

 (Copyright 2002 The Las Vegas Review-Journal)

 

Katherine Albrecht has seen the supermarket of the future, and she doesn't like it.

 

 "I've actually held in my hand the prototype next-generation shopping 'loyalty' card -- a  radio transmission-driven LED (light emitting diodes) shopping card," says the New Hampshire schoolteacher and mother of small children. "There already exist radio frequency devices in shopping carts so they can actually track your movements around the store. They're used in combination with the shoplifting cameras," says Albrecht, founder and head of Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering (www.nocards.org/).

 

 Well, so what? If the market finds out I buy cat food and therefore sends me a coupon when it has a special on cat food, who gets hurt? Sounds pretty symbiotic to me.

 

 "Right now they're at a two-tier price structure, one price with the card and one without the card," Albrecht explains. "They want to move this up to something called 'consumer-specific pricing' -- you and I will each be charged the maximum amount they've determined you will spend; it's actually kind of smart in a devious way. Already they've figured out they can mark the peanut butter on the shelf $4, mark it down to $2.29 if you have the card, and about 10 percent of the time that jar of peanut butter actually sells at $4 to what they call the 'non-price-sensitive customer."

 

 But once these stores have built up the kind of individualized data bases that a couple years of scanning our cards will give them, they're already planning to go much further, Albrecht reports.

 

 At that point, in the not-so-distant future, "As soon as you walk into the store they'll read the chip in your (next-generation) card, while it's still in your purse or wallet. They've developed sensors in the floor; they track you around the store so not only do they know who you are and where you're moving, they know what kind of a shopper you are.

 

 "You, on the other hand, they know you only buy peanut butter every six months, so what if we offer him peanut butter at $1.89?

 

 "The special display on your shopping cart will start flashing when you enter that aisle, telling you there's a $1.89 special on the peanut butter, but that's for you alone; no one else entering that aisle that afternoon may be offered that price. If you buy it, that's the lowest price you'll ever be offered, because they know you'll pay that.

 

 "The next time they'll try $2.29, then $2.59 ... . You'll never get it any lower than what you've paid in the past.

 

 "But I'm what they call a 'price-inflexible shopper' -- they know I have to buy peanut butter every week or else my kids will scream, so they won't offer me any special discount at all ... . "

 

 And even that's just the tip of the iceberg, Albrecht warns. Does anyone think your supermarket won't make its shopping card data available to firms with government grants studying excess obesity and the effectiveness of various programs to manipulate entire populations into improving their nutrition -- starting with special surtaxes on "junk food"?

 

 Government medical and dental programs have already linked to similar shopper monitoring programs in England, she warns. After all, shouldn't someone who follows his doctor's orders and cuts down on salty foods move up in line for that rationed surgery, ahead of someone who ignored his doctor and kept buying junk food?

 

 Some stores are even experimenting with systems that replace the card by simply scanning the customer's registered fingerprint, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer confirms.

 

 Savings? Within a short time after the card programs are introduced, the "special-discount-with-card" price becomes the old, pre-card price, Albrecht says, while the "without-a-card price" can be jacked up to as much as twice the pre-card levels.

 

 At that point, those 10 percent of transactions that proceed without a card-scan are "pure gravy for the store," she reports.

 

 "I used to think that 10 percent was just a number, but increasingly I can put faces with that statistic. ... I got (a) call from a woman who said her son is developmentally disabled, he's retarded. But there's one thing he's able to do for the family: Every week he goes and buys exactly the same groceries. Same brand, everything.

 

 "The first week after they introduced the cards he went in and bought his groceries, but he didn't understand what the card was all about, so when he got home he had spent an extra $8. The 10 percent is the developmentally disabled, the homeless who can't be bothered with a wallet, and it's -- I hate to say it -- the privacy advocates who are so proud of themselves because they won't sign up for the cards ... . "

 

 Here in Las Vegas? Trader Joe's and Wild Oats have no card programs, Albrecht reports. Albertson's, which used to advertise itself as the "no cards, no hassles" store, started testing a card program in Dallas-Fort Worth, and introduced the cards in Northern Nevada last week.

 

 Smith's, a division of Kroger's, is "one of the worst" when it comes to corporate dedication to the new card technology, Albrecht says.

 

 Which leaves Raley's.

 

 "There's a stated policy not to introduce these cards, and it does have to do with privacy issues," explained Raley's spokesperson Carolyn Konrad from her office in Sacramento last week. "At Raley's we really didn't like the way it felt when one person in line got one price and the next person in line got another price."

 

 Albrecht would love to set up a CASPIAN affiliate in Las Vegas; contact her at kma@nocards.org or 603-465-9093.

 

 Me? I used to carry a Smith's "Fresh Values" card. As of this week, I've started driving the extra two miles to Raley's.

 

 Vin Suprynowicz, the Review-Journal's assistant editorial page editor, is author of "The Ballad of Carl Drega." His column appears Sunday.

 

Document lvgs000020020702dy6u0006u

 

 Austinites Rally Against Pre-Crime Shooting by APD

Prison Planet, 16:00, 5 August 2013, 169 words, (English)

On this jam-packed Monday, August 5 transmission of the Alex Jones Show, Alex looks into why the U.S. government is now building mock U.S. cities and towns for training - to invade them. The Benghazi smokescreen continues to linger as U.S. ...

Document WC45668020130806e98500008

 

 

RFID, LTD. Releases SPYCHIPS Book Rebuttal via Google and eBay  

 

427 words

7 November 2021

21:59

Business Wire

BWR

English

(c) 2005  Business Wire. All Rights Reserved.  

 

DENVER - (BUSINESS WIRE) - Nov. 7, 2005 - RFID LTD. (OTC: RFDL) president Nicholas Chavez has published a response to the book SPYCHIPS written by Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre. The document may be found on the company's website or by typing the word SPYCHIPS into the search query field of both Google (NASDAQ: GOOG) and EBAY (NASDAQ: EBAY).  

 

In a crisp 24 pages, Mr. Chavez refutes Albrecht and McIntyre's written evidence and demonstrates his willingness on behalf of RFID, LTD. to cooperate with the authors in order to address both the interests of consumers and other various parties.  

 

"Ms. Albrecht and Ms. McIntyre have accomplished much in garnering the attention of the leaders within the RFID industry," said Nicholas Chavez. "I have in turn endeavored to create a compelling rebuttal document to educate consumers regarding the true capabilities and benefits of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology."  

 

Alongside constructive criticism, Mr. Chavez offers the authors an expense-paid invitation to become certified in RFID technology and further invites the authors to participate on the advisory board of RFID, LTD. to better represent consumer privacy concerns.  

 

Chavez's rebuttal is available via Google and EBAY, or at the following Internet address:  

 

www.packagedrfid.com/spychips_rebuttal.pdf 

 

About RFID, LTD.  

 

RFID LTD. (OTC: RFDL) is the world leader in formulating, testing and deploying vendor neutral UGF radio frequency identification (RFID) solutions for small to medium sized businesses required to comply with Wal-Mart (NYSE: WMT), Target (NYSE: TGT), Best Buy (NYSE: BBY), Albertsons (NYSE: ABS), Home Depot (NYSE: HD) and Department of Defense RFID compliance mandates.  

 

All company and product names may be trademarks of the respective companies with which they are associated.  

 

For more information visit   https://www.rfid-ltd.com  .  

 

Forward-looking Statements This news release may include forward-looking statements within the meaning of section 27A of the United States Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and section 21E of the United States Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, with respect to achieving corporate objectives, developing additional project interests, the company's analysis of opportunities in the acquisition and development of various project interests and certain other matters. These statements are made under the "Safe Harbor" provisions of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and involve risks and uncertainties which could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements contained herein.  

 

Document BWR0000020051107e1b700231

 

Privacy And RFID: Are The Tags Spy Chips? 

 

909 words

3 November 2021

CMP TechWeb

CMPT

English

(c) 2005 CMP Media Inc. 

 

Consumer privacy groups have grown in strength this year almost as fast as radio frequency identification technology deployments at businesses and governments. 

 

Spearheading the most vocal efforts is Katherine Albrecht, founder and director of Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering (CASPIAN), and co-author of the new book Spychips." Albrecht founded CASPIAN in 1999 to advocate free-market, consumer-based solutions to problems she sees as retail privacy invasion, and since 2002, has led efforts to alert the public to privacy and civil liberties implications of RFID. Albrecht said she and co-author Liz McIntyre have uncovered information on surveillance in retail stores that the public needs to know. 

 

She has testified before state legislatures, the Federal Trade Commission, European Commission and Federal Reserve Bank on consumer privacy issues. The following are excerpts from an interview with Albrecht on Wednesday. 

 

Click on this podcast link to download and listen to part one of a two-part series. 

 

Click on this podcast link to download and listen to part two. 

 

TechWeb: How do you see RFID imposing on consumer privacy? 

 

Albrecht: The key problem with RFID boils down to how it's different from a bar code. Think about having computer chips that can transmit information wirelessly using radio waves becoming as ubiquitous as the bar code, and in some cases more prevalent. And the idea that information from the computer chips is scanned whenever it comes in range of a reader device and stored in a database is really a mind boggling concept. It's the notion of assigning every physical object manufactured on earth its own unique ID number and retailers linking our identity to the unique item numbers to keep track of what we purchase when we use a credit or ATM card. 

 

TechWeb: Do you see anything positive emerging from RFID technology? 

 

Albrecht: Sure, there are potential benefits to using RFID if you're in supply chain management and your job is getting widgets from point A to point B. It's effective for tracking physical objects. My concern is when you look at the tradeoff between potential benefits to society and risks of essentially privacy as we know it making it so every physical object is observed at all times. The benefits of having shelves better stocked in stores or faster and efficient product recalls in my mind pale in comparison to the potential threats to civil liberties and privacy at the notion of having a world where everything is seen by global corporations and powerful governments. 

 

TechWeb: What are your thoughts on putting RFID in U.S. passports? 

 

Albrecht: The RFID chipping in passports is probably the first in what is likely a series of government imposed uses. Not only can you put it in passports, but now that we have the Real-ID Act it is possible for the federal government to mandate what forms of technology goes into drivers licenses, for example. We've found documentation that the federal government is looking into technologies that would enable them to scan things like identity documents in your pocket, purse, wallet, literally from speeding cars. What really frightens me is the government is looking seriously at RFID implants, injected into your flesh. 

 

TechWeb: How do you handle the opposition to your ideas? 

 

Albrecht: By simply saying there is not privacy risk, they're not taking adequate measures to ensure the rest of us are protected. One analogy we give in the book is if some is doing nuclear testing near a playground, you probably don't want them doing it at all. If they are doing it, you'd far rather have them say we recognize this stuff is dangerous and we've put many safeguards in place. What scares me is you have people developing RFID technology, spending hundred of millions of dollars, who are looking at the rest of us and saying, risk, there's no risk. As a result they're not taking any precautions to protect us down the road. Our children's and grandchildren's generation will look back and history will judge us based us on how we handle this threat. 

 

TechWeb: Do you see protecting consumer privacy as a passion or obligation? 

 

Albrecht: It's both. When you are as knowledgeable about RFID as Liz and I because we've spent hundreds of hours researching through 30,000 documents to put together "Spychips," and when you look at what these companies have planned and the nightmare vision they are painting for the future, it's difficult not to get discouraged over their ambitious plans. I have a couple hundred thousands e-mails in my in-box from people asking what they should do. 

 

TechWeb: With all the research you did, what is the most disturbing fact you found? 

 

Albrecht: The part that made the hair stand up on the back of my neck was when we looked at patents and information to track people. This is where it gets downright creepy. The patent is titled 'Method in Apparatus for Locating and Tracking Persons.' This involved the surgical implantation of an RFID device deep inside the human body. The company talks about planting the device in the head, torso, and deep muscles in the limbs or organs like the gastro intestinal track where they are impossible to remove without major surgery. 

 

Click to hear Albrecht read from the patent. 

 

Document CMPT000020051105e1b30000h

 

FULL DISCLOSURE. 

 

239 words

1 March 2022

Executive Technology

EXETEC

8

English

Copyright 2004 Fairchild Publications, Inc. All Rights Reserved  

 

I read with interest the interview with the country's most vocal privacy advocate, Katherine Albrecht ("I'm Not Going to Lay Down My Sword"), in the January edition of Executive Technology where she provided her thoughts on RFID radio frequency identification. 

 

At first, I was tempted to dismiss her beliefs as those of someone not in touch with the mainstream consumer. But, as I continued to read the interview, my mind kept coming back to her initial point. That point was, "If you can't tell people what your doing with RFID, you probably shouldn't be doing it, whether it's for their own good or not." 

 

In this era of relationship building with consumers, I ask myself why retailers wouldn't disclose their use of RFID. I understand that deploying RFID is new, technical and complex. However, it seems like the industry would want to respect the concerns of customers and be more forthcoming with them. This seems especially obvious if we are to believe the statistic Albrecht quotes that 78% of consumers object to RFID on privacy grounds. 

 

To me the real question facing the industry is not if, but how, the industry is going to disclose the use of RFID to the consumer. I predict this will be far more challenging than the issues that arise from the technical deployment and costs related to RFID. 

 

Timothy Anglum, Project Management Office, Best Buy. 

 

Document EXETEC0020040315e0310000a

 

 

ST Forum Online

Can IDA's radio frequency plan still be an engine of growth? 

 

Colin Ong Tau Shien 

232 words

26 January 2022

Straits Times

STIMES

English

(c) 2006 Singapore Press Holdings Limited 

 

In my research on the internet, I chanced on a website  www.spychips.com  which supplements a book about Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) by Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre. 

 

I am very surprised by the negative publicity that RFID is generating in the United States, something which is hardly ever publicised in Singapore. 

 

According to the IDA's website on RFID 'the Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore has devised a three-year $10 million plan to develop Radio Frequency Identification or RFID technology as an engine of growth for Singapore's ICT industry. 

 

'Under this plan, IDA aims to build five RFID-enabled supply chain clusters by 2006. It will achieve this by bringing together manufacturers, logistics service providers, retailers, infrastructure providers and solutions providers in the high-tech, pharmaceutical and fast moving consumer goods sectors. The adoption of RFID technologies is expected to make these sectors more competitive globally.' 

 

Has IDA taken into account the current backlash on the violation of privacy issues in the US? Should RFID still be relevant as an engine of growth for the ICT industry or is it business as usual? 

 

I hope government agencies have the flexibility of re-looking at their masterplans when the dynamics of the global environment changes. There are accountability issues involved. 

 

Document STIMES0020060125e21q0001w

 

 Monday: The Alex Jones Show. CPS Destroys Yet Another Family As A Young Girl Pays With Her Life For Their Evil Incompetence. Plus, The...

Prison Planet, 16:00, 5 August 2013, 204 words, Al Qaeda, (English)

Description of video playing:

On this jam-packed Monday, August 5 transmission of the Alex Jones Show, Alex looks into why the U.S. government is now building mock U.S. cities and towns for training - to invade them. The Benghazi smokescreen ...

Document WC45668020130806e98500004

 

 

NEWS

Don't fear new bar codes

 

Larry Downes

707 words

25 September 2022

USA Today

USAT

FINAL

A.23

English

© 2003 USA Today.  Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning.   All Rights Reserved. 

 

"The risk it poses to humanity is on a par with nuclear weapons," Katherine Albrecht says.

 

The deadly new threat Albrecht, the founder of Consumers Against Shopping Privacy Invasion and Numbering, is talking about: the latest development in retail technology, a new generation of bar codes called electronic product codes (EPC). These tiny bar codes send and receive data using radio waves, eliminating manual scanning.

 

This new technology will lower prices, improve selections and supplies, eliminate counterfeits (especially prescription drugs) and reduce theft. Eventually, it will help customers maintain and replace products from a carton of milk to the refrigerator that holds it.

 

The first generation of bar codes has helped do that for nearly 30 years. But if misguided privacy alarmists have their way, the benefits of the next generation of bar codes may be denied or delayed.

 

Privacy advocates are concerned that retailers and manufacturers will use EPC (also called radio frequency identification tags) to track our every purchase, monitor products after they leave the store and use that information without our knowledge.

 

No one likes the thought of being under constant surveillance by either the government or corporate interests. Yet it's hard to see what all of the fuss is about.

 

The EPC tag is a tiny computer chip with a small amount of data storage and a miniature radio antenna. The tags, which can be read whenever they are close to a reader device, identify an item and its location. A central database then provides details such as price and expiration date. Instead of being manually scanned, the EPC tag, in effect, scans itself.

 

Details aren't important

 

Aside from the practical impossibilities of storing the zillions of bytes of data that most worry privacy advocates, the truth is that even the most aggressive marketer doesn't have much use for data about anything more specific than your sex, age and ZIP code.

 

Groups such as the Electronic Privacy Information Center and the Electronic Frontier Foundation are most concerned about what happens once the product leaves the store. In theory, our home computers could some day serve as EPC readers, but only if consumers allow it. For example, EPC could be used to automatically reorder products or let consumers know when an appliance needs preventive maintenance. That's useful, not invasive.

 

Those developing the EPC technology have been working hard to ensure that consumer interests are paramount. The Auto-ID Center -- a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-based consortium of more than 100 leading companies, including Wal-Mart, Procter & Gamble and Sun Microsystems -- has worked on common EPC standards for years. It's about to hand over the management of that standard to the Uniform Code Council, which administers universal bar codes. EPC trials are underway at a few stores in the United States, Europe and Japan.

 

Consumer protections

 

The MIT group soon will issue a set of guidelines for companies that want to use EPC. Its aim is to head off consumer concerns before the technology appears in stores. The guidelines stipulate that consumers:

 

* Must be told if EPC readers and tags are in use.

 

* Must be able to permanently stop the transmission of data to or from tags once they leave the store.

 

* Have the right to buy EPC-tagged products without their identity being linked in any way to the sale.

 

Many think of companies as amoral, profit-hungry beasts that will do anything to promote their own selfish interests. In the case of EPC, the early signs suggest an impressive cooperation aimed at making the transition as smooth as possible and of sharing the benefits of new technology as widely as possible.

 

EPC isn't dangerous. Ignorance is.

 

Larry Downes teaches technology law and strategy at the University of California-Berkeley School of Information Management and Systems. He has no affiliation with the bar code industry.

 

TEXT OF INFO BOX BEGINS HERE:

 

Bar code facts

 

* Invented in 1948 by Bernard Silver and Norman Woodland, Drexel Institute of Technology.

 

* First used commercially in 1967.

 

* Today's vertical bar system developed in 1973 by a consortium of supermarket retailers.

 

* 5 billion scanned worldwide each day.

 

Source: Uniform Code Council 

 

The Forum

 

Document USAT000020030926dz9p00001

 

LOCAL

RALLY PROTESTS MICROCHIPS IN DEMENTIA PATIENTS  

 

By LESTER J. DAVIS  Palm Beach Post Staff Writer  

459 words

13 May 2022

The Palm Beach Post

PMBP

English

Copyright 2007. The Palm Beach Post, All Rights Reserved.  

 

A small group of protesters gathered in front of the Alzheimer's Community Care building Saturday afternoon to speak out against a test program to implant microchips in adults with dementia.  

 

The hope, said Katherine Albrecht, who organized the rally, was to get West Palm Beach-based Alzheimer's Community Care to reconsider a pilot program that would implant microchips, about the size of a grain of rice, in 200 Alzheimer's patients over a two-year period.  

 

"We're here to stand up for vulnerable people and essentially to tell people that it's wrong to put microchips in people," said Albrecht, a privacy advocate from New Hampshire. Albrecht flew to West Palm Beach Friday to head the rally. Most of the two dozen protesters were from Palm Beach County, she said.  

 

The microchips would not be used for tracking purposes, said Mary M. Barnes, president of Alzheimer's Community Care. The microchips would, however, allow hospitals to pull patients' medical histories and see what medications they're on or whether they have health problems.  

 

Alzheimer's Community Care recently teamed with Delray-based  VeriChip Corp., which has manufactured the microchips since 2002, to bring the test program to Palm Beach County, Barnes said.  

 

The microchips will be provided free by VeriChip for the test program, which is expected tostart in the next few months, Barnes said.  

 

The chips are encoded with a 16-digit identification number that can be scanned and entered into a computer to access a patient's medical history. The chips would be implanted into the patients' arms.  

 

Six hospitals in the county are equipped with chip-scanning devices and more will be provided with the machines, Barnes said.  

 

The Food and Drug Administration approved the chips for medical use in 2004.  

 

Michael Zagack of Pembroke Pines said he participated in the rally because he thinks implanting chips in humans is not the most efficient way of retrieving a patient's medical information.  

 

Medical identification bracelets, for example, are less intrusive and just as effective, Zagack said.  

 

"It's an invasion of your privacy and that should not be their position," he said  

 

The program is strictly voluntary, Barnes said. Patients unable to make their own medical decisions may be enrolled by a legal guardian, she said.  

 

The idea of the pilot program has been well-received by local health professionals, and families with relatives suffering from dementia are supportive, Barnes said.  

 

"What we're doing is giving people choices in what types of safety measures they'd like to implement," she said. "This is the wave of the future."  

 

~ lester_davis@pbpost.com  

 

Ran all editions.

 

Document PMBP000020070514e35d0000n

 

 Criminals Want Your Guns: Art

Infowars, 08:07, 23 July 2013, 378 words, George Zimmerman Acquittal, (English)

Monday:The Nightly News. Paul Revere Finalists Begin To Roll Out! Plus, Exclusive Video. A New King Is Born!

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 As Cities Crumble The U.S. Celebrates British Royalty

Infowars, 20:16, 23 July 2013, 382 words, George Zimmerman Acquittal, (English)

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Document WC56576020130723e97n00008

 

 

StartPage and Ixquick Launch Newest Encryption Standards Against Mass Surveillance

 

451 words

24 July 2022

Wireless News

WLNW

English

(c) 2013. Close-Up Media, Inc. All rights reserved.  

 

In the wake of the US PRISM Internet surveillance scandal, companies are revisiting how they do business online and beefing up their privacy practices to protect their users.

 

According to a release, private search engines StartPage and Ixquick have developed a new advance in encryption security this week, becoming the first search engines in the world to enable "Perfect Forward Secrecy" or PFS in combination with a more secure version of SSL encryption known as TLS 1.1. and 1.2, which works by setting up a secure "tunnel" through which users' search traffic cannot be intercepted.

 

Harvard-trained privacy expert Dr. Katherine Albrecht, who helped develop StartPage, says, "We take encryption very seriously, and we've always led the way when it comes to security. We were first to adopt default SSL encryption in 2011, and now we're setting the standard for encryption in the post-PRISM world."

 

SSL encryption has been proven to be an effective tool for protecting sensitive online traffic from eavesdropping and surveillance. However, security researchers now worry that SSL encryption may not provide adequate protection if Government agencies are scooping up large amounts of encrypted traffic and storing it for later decryption.

 

With SSL alone, if a target website's "private key" can be obtained once in the future - perhaps through court order, social engineering, attack against the website, or cryptanalysis - that same key can then be used to unlock all other historical traffic of the affected website. For larger Internet services, that could expose the private data of millions of people.

 

StartPage and Ixquick said they have now deployed a defense against this known as "Perfect Forward Secrecy," or PFS.

 

PFS uses a different "per-session" key for each data transfer, so even if a site's private SSL key is compromised, data that was previously transmitted is still safe. Those who want to decrypt large quantities of data sent using PFS face the daunting task of individually decrypting each separate file, as opposed to obtaining a single key to unlock them all.

 

This can be likened to replacing the master "skeleton key" that unlocks every room in a building with a tight security system that puts a new lock on each door and then creates a unique key for each lock.

 

CEO Robert Beens urges other companies to upgrade to these new technologies. "With Perfect Forward Secrecy and TLS 1.1 and 1.2 combined, we are once again leading the privacy industry forward. For the sake of their users' privacy, we strongly recommend other search engines follow our lead."

 

((Comments on this story may be sent to newsdesk@closeupmedia.com))

 

Document WLNW000020130724e97o0005b

 

Ixquick; Startpage, World's #1 Privacy Search Engine, to Launch in Australia

 

482 words

14 June 2022

Internet Weekly News

INTWKN

38

English

© Copyright 2010 Internet Weekly News via NewsRx.com  

 

2010 JUN 14 - (VerticalNews.com) -- Startpage by Ixquick, the global leader in private Internet search for over a decade, is excited to announce the launch of "Startpage Australia," a region-specific version of the popular Startpage.com search engine. The website, set to debut in June, is online at www.Startpage.com/au.

 

Startpage VP of Marketing and Media Relations, privacy expert Dr. Katherine Albrecht, will visit Australia from June 1-9 to meet with Australian privacy advocates and speak with government officials. Startpage will hold a press conference in Sydney on June 3 to launch the service.

 

Designed to address the privacy needs of Australia's 20 million people, Startpage Australia will supplement Startpage's existing search results with data from local, Australia-specific websites and portals. The search results will be more geared to local tastes and preferences, making Startpage the ideal search engine for privacy-conscious Australians.

 

The move comes as Australians have grown alarmed at government controls and incursions into their use of the Internet. A leaked blacklist of government censored websites last year caused a firestorm of controversy, and last month Google released figures showing that the Australian government submitted more than 150 requests for user data to Google in a recent six-month period.

 

"The serious problems of Internet censorship and personal data collection in Australia are issues of worldwide concern. We are reaching out to help with the launch of Startpage AU," said Ixquick CEO Robert Beens. "We want to extend a warm welcome to the people of Australia, and invite them to use the Startpage search engine as a tool to protect their privacy and anonymity."

 

As a "meta-search engine," Startpage allows users to anonymously search nine other search engines at once and receive the best results privately. Startpage does not record user IP addresses or use tracking cookies. In contrast, other major search engines such as Bing, Yahoo, and Google record every search query made through their websites and link them to the user's IP address.

 

Startpage provides secure SSL encryption and offers a proxy service that allows users to anonymously visit the sites they find through the Startpage search engine. Startpage has been widely praised by the privacy community, receiving kudos from the Electronic Frontier Foundation, privacy regulators in Europe, and Internet users worldwide. About Startpage by Ixquick Startpage is the English-language version of Ixquick, the only search engine in the world that is thirdparty certified not to record users' IP addresses or make a record of their searches. Startpage's privacy practices have been awarded the highest possible rating by EuroPrise, the European certifying authority, and are widely considered the best in the business.

 

This article was prepared by Internet Weekly News editors from staff and other reports. Copyright 2010, Internet Weekly News via VerticalNews.com.

 

Document INTWKN0020100611e66e00018

 

 Obamacare: Doctors Planning Career Exit

Infowars, 03:06, 22 July 2013, 578 words, Bob Unruh, (English)

In a survey by a top research firm, six in 10 physicians said it is likely many doctors will retire earlier than planned in the next one to three years.

Document WC56576020130722e97l0000d

 

 

StartPage and Ixquick Launch Newest Encryption Standards against Mass Surveillance

 

550 words

24 July 2022

Manufacturing Close-Up

MFGCLU

English

(c) 2013. Close-Up Media, Inc. All rights reserved.  

 

Private search engines StartPage and Ixquick have deployed a new advance in encryption security this week, becoming the first search engines in the world to enable "Perfect Forward Secrecy" or PFS in combination with a more secure version of SSL encryption known as TLS 1.1. and 1.2, which works by setting up a secure "tunnel" through which users' search traffic cannot be intercepted.

 

In a release, the company noted that this the latest in a series of security firsts by StartPage and Ixquick, which pioneered the field of private search in 2006. Combined, StartPage/Ixquick is the largest private search engine, serving well over 4 million searches daily.

 

Harvard-trained privacy expert Dr. Katherine Albrecht, who helped develop StartPage, says, "We take encryption very seriously, and we've always led the way when it comes to security. We were first to adopt default SSL encryption in 2011, and now we're setting the standard for encryption in the post-PRISM world."

 

SSL encryption has been shown to be an effective tool for protecting sensitive online traffic from eavesdropping and surveillance. However, security researchers now worry that SSL encryption may not provide adequate protection if Government agencies are scooping up large amounts of encrypted traffic and storing it for later decryption.

 

With SSL alone, if a target website's "private key" can be obtained once in the future - perhaps through court order, social engineering, attack against the website, or cryptanalysis - that same key can then be used to unlock all other historical traffic of the affected website. For larger Internet services, that could expose the private data of millions of people.

 

StartPage and Ixquick have now deployed a defense against this known as "Perfect Forward Secrecy," or PFS.

 

PFS uses a different "per-session" key for each data transfer, so even if a site's private SSL key is compromised, data that was previously transmitted is still safe. Those who want to decrypt large quantities of data sent using PFS face the daunting task of individually decrypting each separate file, as opposed to obtaining a single key to unlock them all.

 

This can be likened to replacing the master "skeleton key" that unlocks every room in a building with a tight security system that puts a new lock on each door and then creates a unique key for each lock.

 

In addition to its use of PFS, earlier this month StartPage and Ixquick deployed Transport Layer Security, or TLS, encryption versions TLS 1.1 and 1.2 on all of its servers. TLS is an upgraded form of SSL encryption, which sets up a secure "tunnel" that protects users' search information.

 

In independent evaluation, StartPage and Ixquick outscore their competitors on encryption standards.

 

CEO Robert Beens urges other companies to upgrade to these new technologies. "With Perfect Forward Secrecy and TLS 1.1 and 1.2 combined, we are once again leading the privacy industry forward. For the sake of their users' privacy, we strongly recommend other search engines follow our lead."

 

Qualys' SSL Labs evaluation of StartPage's Encryption Features:

 

https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/analyze.html?d=startpage.com&s=69.90.210.72

 

((Comments on this story may be sent to newsdesk@closeupmedia.com))

 

Document MFGCLU0020130724e97o0001q

 

 

Startpage, Worlds #1 Privacy Search Engine, to Launch in Australia ; Privacy powerhouse goes "down under" to offer private, anonymous search geared to local interests

 

501 words

1 June 2022

23:00

Business Wire

BWR

English

(c) 2010  Business Wire. All Rights Reserved.  

 

ZEIST, Netherlands - (BUSINESS WIRE) - Startpage by Ixquick, the global leader in private Internet search for over a decade, is excited to announce the launch of "Startpage Australia," a region-specific version of the popular Startpage.com search engine. The website, set to debut in June, is online at www.Startpage.com/au.

 

Startpage VP of Marketing and Media Relations, privacy expert Dr. Katherine Albrecht, will visit Australia from June 1-9 to meet with Australian privacy advocates and speak with government officials. Startpage will hold a press conference in Sydney on June 3 to launch the service.

 

Designed to address the privacy needs of Australia's 20 million people, Startpage Australia will supplement Startpage's existing search results with data from local, Australia-specific websites and portals. The search results will be more geared to local tastes and preferences, making Startpage the ideal search engine for privacy-conscious Australians.

 

The move comes as Australians have grown alarmed at government controls and incursions into their use of the Internet. A leaked blacklist of government censored websites last year caused a firestorm of controversy, and last month Google released figures showing that the Australian government submitted more than 150 requests for user data to Google in a recent six-month period.

 

"The serious problems of Internet censorship and personal data collection in Australia are issues of worldwide concern. We are reaching out to help with the launch of Startpage AU," said Ixquick CEO Robert Beens. "We want to extend a warm welcome to the people of Australia, and invite them to use the Startpage search engine as a tool to protect their privacy and anonymity."

 

As a "meta-search engine," Startpage allows users to anonymously search nine other search engines at once and receive the best results privately. Startpage does not record user IP addresses or use tracking cookies. In contrast, other major search engines such as Bing, Yahoo, and Google record every search query made through their websites and link them to the user's IP address.

 

Startpage provides secure SSL encryption and offers a proxy service that allows users to anonymously visit the sites they find through the Startpage search engine. Startpage has been widely praised by the privacy community, receiving kudos from the Electronic Frontier Foundation, privacy regulators in Europe, and Internet users worldwide.

 

About Startpage by Ixquick

 

Startpage is the English-language version of Ixquick, the only search engine in the world that is thirdparty certified not to record users' IP addresses or make a record of their searches. Startpage's privacy practices have been awarded the highest possible rating by EuroPrise, the European certifying authority, and are widely considered the best in the business.

 

Document BWR0000020100601e661004l9

 

 

CVS DATA FAULT SHUTS OFF ONLINE SERVICE 

 

206 words

24 June 2022

Cardline

CRDF

1

Vol. 5, No. 25

English

(c) 2005 Cardline and SourceMedia, Inc.  All rights reserved.   

 

An online service connected to drug store chain CVS Corp.'s loyalty card has been shut down after a security flaw was found, says the drugstore chain. Katherine Albrecht, director of Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering, demonstrated the data fault to a group of reporters. Consumers who signed up for a CVS ExtraCare card could log on to the CVS Web site with their card number, ZIP code and first three letters of a customer's last name. Then, they could request an e-mail containing a copy of recent purchases, useful for filing a tax claim for over-the-counter purchases. The e-mail does not contain prescription information, Social Security numbers nor credit card numbers, CVS said. CVS also said that online access to the information has been halted until an additional security measure can be put in place. CVS said it is not aware of any improper access to the site. In the meantime, ExtraCare cardholders can call CVS to get the same information. 

 

 CVS operates 5,400 stores in 36 states and the District of Columbia. 

 

(c) 2005 CardLine and SourceMedia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  https://www.cardforum.com https://www.sourcemedia.com

 

Document CRDF000020050624e16o0000v

 

Proxy-based search engine joins local filter battle

 

James Hutchinson  

840 words

2 June 2022

Computerworld (Australia)

IDGCWA

English

(c) 2010 IDG Communications Pty Ltd All Rights Reserved  

 

A Netherlands-based meta-search engine has opened its doors in Australia for the first time in an effort to help users circumvent the Government's proposed mandatory Internet filtering scheme. Startpage Australia, an English-language version of Ixquick, claims to be the most private search engine in the world by deleting user IP addresses within 48 hours, as well as offering SSL encryption and, more recently, an integrated proxy to anonymise all traffic linked through search results. While the proxy has been available since January, company spokesperson, Katherine Albrecht, told Computerworld Australia that the expansion to Australia would be the first time the proxy has been offered for a particular purpose. "The key thing we're trying to do is to bring some international attention to the plight faced by Australia with the potential of Internet censorship," she said.

 

 Under the Government's filtering scheme, users would be barred access at the Internet service provider (ISP) level to websites which host refused classification material, as mandated by the Classification Board and enforced under a blacklist held by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA). While some ISPs have expressed their commitment to such a scheme, not all are in favour. Nevertheless, as in China and other countries which have a similar scheme, users can still circumvent the filter by using proxies. "It would be interesting to see how the Australian government responds to our proxy service," Albrecht said. "That's a battle we'll fight when it comes to that point." Communications minister, Stephen Conroy, has been reported as saying that such circumvention methods would continue to be legal if the filter is ever enforced. One pro-euthanasia organisation, Exit International, has already begun educating the elderly on how to circumvent such a filter. Ixquick's proxy servers are currently hosted in Netherlands, while servers for its search engines are currently hosted in the US and Europe. Chief executive officer, Robert Beens, said that the company would consider hosting some servers locally if performance demands warranted such an action, but said that such a move would be considered in balance with any potential privacy concerns in moving servers to another jurisdiction. Ixquick doesn't have its own search index; instead, search results are fed via proxy through nine different third party engines - including Bing, Yahoo, Ask, Altavista and Lycos - with results combined and duplicates eliminated in the final results page for the user. Beens claims this eradicates any artificial ranking from search engine optimisation (SEO) while also providing Startpage Australia with a greater index of the Web. The use of different search engines also means Startpage Australia isn't as prone to censored search results as a single search engine. Albrecht conceded that Startpage Australia does initially see the user's IP address, and tailors sponsored search results based on the search query. However, IP addresses and other personal information are not forwarded to the search engines used or any website linked through the search results. European privacy consortium, EuroPriSe, found Ixquick deleted all non-personal information within 14 days, and awarded the company its first ICT-focussed privacy seal in 2008. Ixquick, which has served 1.2 billion search results in nine languages since its inception 10 years ago, is yet to face larger privacy challenges in the likes of China and Burma. While Albrecht said the company had fielded queries from users within the countries, these make a minimal proportion of its overall user base. "I'd like to see more users coming in from Burma, or certain places where there's a real need for what we do," she said. The company is also looking to introduce a private web-based email system by the end of the year, with the additional ability to possibly securely download email and delete it from the server. The new service would be targeted directly against Google's Gmail, which scans users' emails for keywords to use in tailored advertising. "Any Internet censorship or data collection by governments or corporations without peoples' express consent is problematic; our whole business model is based on that belief," Albrecht said. While typically respected as aggregators of information around the Internet, key search engines like Google and Yahoo! have been embroiled in privacy issues over recent years, mainly surrounding requests for information from US and Chinese governments. While Google has recently announced an end to its cooperation in censoring Chinese search engine results, it fielded 17 requests in 2009 alone from the Australian government to remove content or provide information. "Google's database of information is the single biggest dossier of information ever collected on anyone in all of human history," Albrecht said. "They've become a target for governments or hackers that want information about people." However, Startpage Australia's lack of personal information means Ixquick doesn't have the same commodity of user information. "Even if they were able to obtain jurisdiction, there would really be nothing to get," Albrecht said.

 

517074869

 

Document IDGCWA0020100602e66200003

 

IT Confidential

RFID: Be Smart, Not Cynical, About Religion 

 

John Soat 

602 words

7 November 2021

InformationWeek

IWK

16

1063

English

Copyright (c) 2005 CMP Media LLC 

 

I'm reading a book called Spychips: How Major Corporations And Government Plan To Track Your Every Move With RFID (Nelson Current; 2005). The book is selling well: It's currently #19 on Amazon.com's list of best-selling non-fiction/current affairs books. It's written by Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre. If you follow the debates about privacy, Albrecht's name might be familiar. She is the founder and head of Caspian (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion And Numbering), a privacy lobbying group. (An interview with Albrecht is at informationweek.com/ 1063/albrecht.htm.) 

 

I recommend reading Spychips; it contains a lot of interesting information about radio-frequency ID technology. For example, did you know that IBM has applied for a patent for "Identification And Tracking Of Persons Using RFID-Tagged Items." As we know, all patent applications are realistic and feasible. In fact, doesn't IBM have a patent for a system to organize bathroom lines on airplanes? Anyway, I went looking for other books by Albrecht, and I found this on Amazon, a book scheduled for publication early next year: The Spychips Threat: Why Christians Should Resist RFID And Computer Tracking (Nelson Current; 2006). Albrecht had mentioned a religious objection to RFID in Spychips: "This application startles many Christians, who have likened payment applications of RFID to biblical predictions about the Mark of the Beast, a number the book of Revelation says will be needed to buy or sell in the 'end time.'" 

 

This worries me. Religious opposition to technology could be a serious factor, and it isn't something to be taken lightly. Religious issues are a part of both the political and educational landscape. Why not technology? Could religious objections be a significant factor in slowing the adoption of RFID? I E-mailed an old friend and former colleague, Mark Roberti, who heads up RFIDJournal. "I don't see the religious angle having any impact on [RFID] adoption," Mark wrote back. Then he threw me. "My personal view is that Katherine doesn't believe the religious stuff but uses it to achieve her aim, which is to persuade people not to accept RFID tags in the products they buy. I could be wrong about that." Cynical and exploitative about the religious implications of RFID? Albrecht doesn't sound that way in a podcast by my colleague Laurie Sullivan (informationweek.com/1063/albrecht _pod.htm). But others may be. I found an article on Wired News from July that explores this area. In it, Bill Scannell, identified as "a privacy advocate" (and reportedly founder of the Web site  www.dontspy  on.us), is quoted as saying: "I can work with anyone willing to fight this stuff." That's not the most idealistic reason to embrace a religious conviction, but it may indicate how serious certain factions are in raising objections to RFID-and how seriously they should be taken. 

 

I can't wait for RFID tagging-then maybe I can find half the stuff I lose, like the TV remote control, or my socks, or my dog when she runs away down the street. Wait, who gets access to the tracking part of this equation? Maybe I have more in common with "privacy advocates" than I think. I'd certainly rather be the tracker than than the trackee-but that applies to all aspects of my life. If you've got one of those tracking devices, or an industry tip, send it to jsoat@cmp.com, or call 516-562-5326. 

 

https://informationweek.com/

 

Document IWK0000020051107e1b70000p

 

 StartPage and Ixquick Deploy Newest Encryption Standards against Mass Surveillance

iStockAnalyst, 01:57, 20 July 2013, 551 words, (English)

In the wake of the US PRISM Internet surveillance scandal, companies are revisiting how they do business online and beefing up their privacy practices to protect their users.

Document WC58208020130719e97j0020k

 

 StartPage and Ixquick Deploy Newest Encryption Standards against Mass Surveillance

Virtual-Strategy Magazine, 02:02, 20 July 2013, 550 words, (English)

In the wake of the US PRISM Internet surveillance scandal, companies are revisiting how they do business online and beefing up their privacy practices to protect their users.

Document WC62867020130720e97j0001a

 

 StartPage and Ixquick Deploy Newest Encryption Standards against Mass Surveillance

Generation-NT, 00:02, 20 July 2013, 553 words, Business Wire, (English)

In the wake of the US PRISM Internet surveillance scandal, companies are revisiting how they do business online and beefing up their privacy practices to protect their users.

Document WC62852020130720e97j0000f

 

 

Radio ID tags spread waves of anger among privacy activists.

 

By SIMON LONDON.

797 words

1 March 2022

Financial Times

FTFT

24

English

(c) 2003 The Financial Times Limited. All rights reserved

 

Radio ID tags spread waves of anger among privacy activists - Planned successor to barcodes has raised Big Brother suspicions, says Simon London.

 

Ultimately this technology will enslave humanity," says Katherine Albrecht, a privacy campaigner and Harvard University doctoral student.

 

The objects of her ire are radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags, slivers of silicon coming soon to supermarket shelves.

 

Gillette, the US consumer products group, last month ordered 500m RFID tags for tracking packets of razors through its supply chain. Michelin has developed a manufacturing process to vulcanise a tag into every tyre.

 

Many companies see RFID tags as the 21st century successors to barcodes, but activists see a world where the movement of every object - and by implication every person - can be monitored.

 

Ms Albrecht, who runs Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering (Caspian), a group that opposes data collection by retailers, is among the most vociferous opponents of RFID technology.

 

Many Caspian members, she says, "would rather walk naked than wear clothes that have been tagged".

 

Chris Hoofnagle, of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (Epic), a Washington-based watchdog says: "There are going to be any number of entities who will want to use the information collected from RFID tags to track individuals or groups. The issue is control. Can you determine when the tag is active and who is using the information collected?"

 

An RFID tag consists of a silicon chip with a unique serial number. Pass the chip through a radio frequency field and it can broadcast its identity for a few feet.

 

According to Caspian, proponents of the RFID tag envisage a pervasive global network of millions of receivers along the entire supply chain - in airports, seaports, along roads, in distribution centres, warehouses, retail stores, and homes. This, Caspian says, would allow for seamless, continuous identification and tracking of physical items as they move from one place to another, enabling companies to determine the whereabouts of all their products at all times.

 

One of the tag's big advantages over barcodes is that information can be collected without a line of sight to the tag. This makes it possible to scan a pallet of goods by simply passing it through a radio field. Moreover, RFID chips can store enough information to give each item - not merely each product line - a unique identity. This should allow companies to be more precise about recalls of faulty products, for example.

 

While the idea has been around for 30 years, the chips are only now becoming cheap enough for companies to consider widespread deployment.

 

Gillette is believed to be paying between 15 cents and 25 cents for each tag. Alien Technology, its California-based supplier, says the cost per tag could fall to 5 cents or below if tags are manufactured in high volume. Getting the price down will be essential if RFID tags are to be economically viable for low-value goods.

 

Procter &Gamble, the household goods group, is also running a pilot project. And retailers such as Wal-Mart in the US, Tesco in the UK and Metro in Germany are testing the technology. The stores have been attracted by potential applications including "smart shelves" that sense when items are removed and re-order automatically, and check-outs that calculate totals when a shopping cart is wheeled through a radio field.

 

But it is possible to see how RFID technology could be misused and some consumers are taking steps to protect themselves against being tracked. From a small office in Brooklyn, Stephen Galluccio sells bags lined with radio frequency-blocking material. It is not only RFID tags against which consumers should think about protecting themselves, he says.

 

The location-tracking chips in cell phones and toll payment cards have similar privacy implications, he argues. "They are selling technology that does not turn off. You just don't have control anymore."

 

Suggestions for an industry-wide solution range from Ms Albrecht's call for a total ban to self-regulation and restraint by companies.

 

Mark Roberti, editor of the RFID Journal, an online newsletter, argues for a code of practice that would switch off tags once they have been scanned at the point of sale.

 

The tag specification drawn up by the Auto-ID Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has a"self-destruct" command, allowing its owner to deactivate it.

 

Mr Hoofnagle goes further. He calls on the US government to set up a data protection commission to look at the privacy implications of RFID and other emerging technologies.

 

On one thing, however, almost everyone agrees: without a concerted effort to address concerns about privacy, RFID technology could face a public backlash. www.ft.com/infotech

 

London Edition 3.

 

Document ftft000020030301dz310003t

 

StartPage; StartPage and Ixquick Deploy Newest Encryption Standards against Mass Surveillance

 

611 words

6 August 2022

Information Technology Newsweekly

INTEWK

140

English

© Copyright 2013 Information Technology Newsweekly via VerticalNews.com  

 

2013 AUG 6 (VerticalNews) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Information Technology Newsweekly -- In the wake of the US PRISM Internet surveillance scandal, companies are revisiting how they do business online and beefing up their privacy practices to protect their users.

 

Private search engines StartPage and Ixquick have pioneered a new advance in encryption security this week, becoming the first search engines in the world to enable "Perfect Forward Secrecy" or PFS in combination with a more secure version of SSL encryption known as TLS 1.1. and 1.2 , which works by setting up a secure "tunnel" through which users' search traffic cannot be intercepted.

 

This is the latest in a series of security firsts by StartPage and Ixquick, which pioneered the field of private search in 2006. Combined, StartPage/Ixquick is the largest private search engine, serving well over 4 million searches daily.

 

Harvard-trained privacy expert Dr. Katherine Albrecht, who helped develop StartPage, says, "We take encryption very seriously, and we've always led the way when it comes to security. We were first to adopt default SSL encryption in 2011, and now we're setting the standard for encryption in the post-PRISM world."

 

SSL encryption has been proven to be an effective tool for protecting sensitive online traffic from eavesdropping and surveillance. However, security researchers now worry that SSL encryption may not provide adequate protection if Government agencies are scooping up large amounts of encrypted traffic and storing it for later decryption.

 

With SSL alone, if a target website's "private key" can be obtained once in the future - perhaps through court order, social engineering, attack against the website, or cryptanalysis - that same key can then be used to unlock all other historical traffic of the affected website. For larger Internet services, that could expose the private data of millions of people.

 

StartPage and Ixquick have now deployed a defense against this known as "Perfect Forward Secrecy," or PFS.

 

PFS uses a different "per-session" key for each data transfer, so even if a site's private SSL key is compromised, data that was previously transmitted is still safe. Those who want to decrypt large quantities of data sent using PFS face the daunting task of individually decrypting each separate file, as opposed to obtaining a single key to unlock them all.

 

This can be likened to replacing the master "skeleton key" that unlocks every room in a building with a tight security system that puts a new lock on each door and then creates a unique key for each lock.

 

In addition to its pioneering use of PFS, earlier this month StartPage and Ixquick deployed Transport Layer Security, or TLS, encryption versions TLS 1.1 and 1.2 on all of its servers. TLS is an upgraded form of SSL encryption, which sets up a secure "tunnel" that protects users' search information.

 

In independent evaluation, StartPage and Ixquick outscore their competitors on encryption standards. (See Qualys' SSL Labs evaluation of StartPage's encryption features: https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/analyze.html?d=startpage.com&s=69.90.210.72 )

 

CEO Robert Beens urges other companies to upgrade to these new technologies. "With Perfect Forward Secrecy and TLS 1.1 and 1.2 combined, we are once again leading the privacy industry forward. For the sake of their users' privacy, we strongly recommend other search engines follow our lead."

 

Keywords for this news article include: StartPage, Information Technology, Information and Data Encoding and Encryption.

 

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2013, NewsRx LLC

 

Document INTEWK0020130802e98600039

 

 

Startpage to Launch Services in Australia

 

350 words

5 June 2022

Entertainment Close-Up

ENTCUP

English

(c) 2010. Close-Up Media, Inc. All rights reserved.  

 

Startpage, a supplier of private Internet search solutions, announced the launch of "Startpage Australia," a region-specific version of the Startpage.com search engine.

 

The website, set to debut this month, is online at startpage.com/au.

 

Startpage VP of Marketing and Media Relations, privacy expert Dr. Katherine Albrecht, will visit Australia from June 1-9 to meet with Australian privacy advocates and speak with government officials.

 

Designed to address the privacy needs of Australia's 20 million people, the company noted, Startpage Australia will supplement Startpage's existing search results with data from local, Australia-specific websites and portals. The search results will be more geared to local tastes and preferences, making Startpage the ideal search engine for privacy-conscious Australians.

 

The move comes as Australians have grown alarmed at government controls and incursions into their use of the Internet. A leaked blacklist of government censored websites last year caused a firestorm of controversy, and last month Google released figures showing that the Australian government submitted more than 150 requests for user data to Google in a recent six-month period.

 

"The serious problems of Internet censorship and personal data collection in Australia are issues of concern," said Ixquick CEO Robert Beens. "We are reaching out to help with the launch of Startpage AU. We want to extend a warm welcome to the people of Australia, and invite them to use the Startpage search engine as a tool to protect their privacy and anonymity."

 

As a "meta-search engine," Startpage allows users to anonymously search nine other search engines at once and receive the best results privately. Startpage does not record user IP addresses or use tracking cookies. In contrast, other search engines such as Bing, Yahoo, and Google record every search query made through their websites and link them to the user's IP address.

 

Startpage provides secure SSL encryption and offers a proxy service that allows users to anonymously visit the sites they find through the Startpage search engine.

 

((Comments on this story may be sent to newsdesk@closeupmedia.com))

 

Document ENTCUP0020100626e665000ab

 

 

Startpage to Launch Services in Australia

 

350 words

4 June 2022

Wireless News

WLNW

English

(c) 2010. Close-Up Media, Inc. All rights reserved.  

 

Startpage, a provider of private Internet search solutions, announced the launch of "Startpage Australia," a region-specific version of the Startpage.com search engine.

 

The website, set to debut this month, is online at startpage.com/au.

 

Startpage VP of Marketing and Media Relations, privacy expert Dr. Katherine Albrecht, will visit Australia from June 1-9 to meet with Australian privacy advocates and speak with government officials.

 

Designed to address the privacy needs of Australia's 20 million people, the company noted, Startpage Australia will supplement Startpage's existing search results with data from local, Australia-specific websites and portals. The search results will be more geared to local tastes and preferences, making Startpage the ideal search engine for privacy-conscious Australians.

 

The move comes as Australians have grown alarmed at government controls and incursions into their use of the Internet. A leaked blacklist of government censored websites last year caused a firestorm of controversy, and last month Google released figures showing that the Australian government submitted more than 150 requests for user data to Google in a recent six-month period.

 

"The serious problems of Internet censorship and personal data collection in Australia are issues of concern," said Ixquick CEO Robert Beens. "We are reaching out to help with the launch of Startpage AU. We want to extend a warm welcome to the people of Australia, and invite them to use the Startpage search engine as a tool to protect their privacy and anonymity."

 

As a "meta-search engine," Startpage allows users to anonymously search nine other search engines at once and receive the best results privately. Startpage does not record user IP addresses or use tracking cookies. In contrast, other search engines such as Bing, Yahoo, and Google record every search query made through their websites and link them to the user's IP address.

 

Startpage provides secure SSL encryption and offers a proxy service that allows users to anonymously visit the sites they find through the Startpage search engine.

 

((Comments on this story may be sent to newsdesk@closeupmedia.com))

 

Document WLNW000020100604e6640002u

 

 A Dream Revered

Infowars, 08:56, 20 July 2013, 621 words, Alex Jones Speaks, (English)

Huron Films, LLC shows the power that’s grown within our government through out the years and rightfully places part of the blame on citizens for sitting by idly as the tyranny spreads.

Document WC56576020130720e97j00007

 

 

StartPage and Ixquick Deploy Newest Encryption Standards against Mass Surveillance

 

614 words

20 July 2022

02:02

Press Association National Newswire

PRESSA

English

(c)2013, The Press Association, All Rights Reserved  

 

First search engines to offer TLS 1.1.and 1.2 as well as “Perfect Forward Secrecy”

 

Business Editors

 

NEW YORK & AMSTERDAM--(Business Wire)--July 19, 2013

 

In the wake of the US PRISM Internet surveillance scandal, companies are revisiting how they do business online and beefing up their privacy practices to protect their users.

 

Private search engines StartPage and Ixquick have pioneered a new advance in encryption security this week, becoming the first search engines in the world to enable "Perfect Forward Secrecy" or PFS in combination with a more secure version of SSL encryption known as TLS 1.1. and 1.2 , which works by setting up a secure "tunnel" through which users' search traffic cannot be intercepted.

 

This is the latest in a series of security firsts by StartPage and Ixquick, which pioneered the field of private search in 2006. Combined, StartPage/Ixquick is the largest private search engine, serving well over 4 million searches daily.

 

Harvard-trained privacy expert Dr. Katherine Albrecht, who helped develop StartPage, says, "We take encryption very seriously, and we've always led the way when it comes to security. We were first to adopt default SSL encryption in 2011, and now we're setting the standard for encryption in the post-PRISM world."

 

SSL encryption has been proven to be an effective tool for protecting sensitive online traffic from eavesdropping and surveillance. However, security researchers now worry that SSL encryption may not provide adequate protection if Government agencies are scooping up large amounts of encrypted traffic and storing it for later decryption.

 

With SSL alone, if a target website's "private key" can be obtained once in the future - perhaps through court order, social engineering, attack against the website, or cryptanalysis - that same key can then be used to unlock all other historical traffic of the affected website. For larger Internet services, that could expose the private data of millions of people.

 

StartPage and Ixquick have now deployed a defense against this known as "Perfect Forward Secrecy," or PFS.

 

PFS uses a different "per-session" key for each data transfer, so even if a site's private SSL key is compromised, data that was previously transmitted is still safe. Those who want to decrypt large quantities of data sent using PFS face the daunting task of individually decrypting each separate file, as opposed to obtaining a single key to unlock them all.

 

This can be likened to replacing the master "skeleton key" that unlocks every room in a building with a tight security system that puts a new lock on each door and then creates a unique key for each lock.

 

In addition to its pioneering use of PFS, earlier this month StartPage and Ixquick deployed Transport Layer Security, or TLS, encryption versions TLS 1.1 and 1.2 on all of its servers. TLS is an upgraded form of SSL encryption, which sets up a secure "tunnel" that protects users' search information.

 

In independent evaluation, StartPage and Ixquick outscore their competitors on encryption standards. (See Qualys' SSL Labs evaluation of StartPage's encryption features:

 

https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/analyze.html?d=startpage.com&s=69.90.210.72 )

 

CEO Robert Beens urges other companies to upgrade to these new technologies. "With Perfect Forward Secrecy and TLS 1.1 and 1.2 combined, we are once again leading the privacy industry forward. For the sake of their users' privacy, we strongly recommend other search engines follow our lead."

 

Contact:

 

U.S. Press Contact: 


 

Tiffany Daschke


 

(877) 434-3100 ext. 2

 

or

 

E.U. Press Contact: 


 

Alex van Eesteren 


 

+31-30-6971778


 

Document PRESSA0020130719e97j006ep

 

 

StartPage and Ixquick Deploy Newest Encryption Standards against Mass Surveillance

 

613 words

20 July 2022

02:02

Business Wire

BWR

English

(c) 2013  Business Wire. All Rights Reserved.  

 

First search engines to offer TLS 1.1.and 1.2 as well as "Perfect Forward Secrecy"

 

 

NEW YORK & AMSTERDAM--(BUSINESS WIRE)--July 19, 2013--

 

In the wake of the US PRISM Internet surveillance scandal, companies are revisiting how they do business online and beefing up their privacy practices to protect their users.

 

Private search engines StartPage and Ixquick have pioneered a new advance in encryption security this week, becoming the first search engines in the world to enable "Perfect Forward Secrecy" or PFS in combination with a more secure version of SSL encryption known as TLS 1.1. and 1.2 , which works by setting up a secure "tunnel" through which users' search traffic cannot be intercepted.

 

This is the latest in a series of security firsts by StartPage and Ixquick, which pioneered the field of private search in 2006. Combined, StartPage/Ixquick is the largest private search engine, serving well over 4 million searches daily.

 

Harvard-trained privacy expert Dr. Katherine Albrecht, who helped develop StartPage, says, "We take encryption very seriously, and we've always led the way when it comes to security. We were first to adopt default SSL encryption in 2011, and now we're setting the standard for encryption in the post-PRISM world."

 

SSL encryption has been proven to be an effective tool for protecting sensitive online traffic from eavesdropping and surveillance. However, security researchers now worry that SSL encryption may not provide adequate protection if Government agencies are scooping up large amounts of encrypted traffic and storing it for later decryption.

 

With SSL alone, if a target website's "private key" can be obtained once in the future - perhaps through court order, social engineering, attack against the website, or cryptanalysis - that same key can then be used to unlock all other historical traffic of the affected website. For larger Internet services, that could expose the private data of millions of people.

 

StartPage and Ixquick have now deployed a defense against this known as "Perfect Forward Secrecy," or PFS.

 

PFS uses a different "per-session" key for each data transfer, so even if a site's private SSL key is compromised, data that was previously transmitted is still safe. Those who want to decrypt large quantities of data sent using PFS face the daunting task of individually decrypting each separate file, as opposed to obtaining a single key to unlock them all.

 

This can be likened to replacing the master "skeleton key" that unlocks every room in a building with a tight security system that puts a new lock on each door and then creates a unique key for each lock.

 

In addition to its pioneering use of PFS, earlier this month StartPage and Ixquick deployed Transport Layer Security, or TLS, encryption versions TLS 1.1 and 1.2 on all of its servers. TLS is an upgraded form of SSL encryption, which sets up a secure "tunnel" that protects users' search information.

 

In independent evaluation, StartPage and Ixquick outscore their competitors on encryption standards. (See Qualys' SSL Labs evaluation of StartPage's encryption features:

 

https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/analyze.html?d=startpage.com&s=69.90.210.72 )

 

CEO Robert Beens urges other companies to upgrade to these new technologies. "With Perfect Forward Secrecy and TLS 1.1 and 1.2 combined, we are once again leading the privacy industry forward. For the sake of their users' privacy, we strongly recommend other search engines follow our lead."

 

Document BWR0000020130719e97j0006y

 

The human micro-chip is it going too far?

 

Thea Dikeos  

1,268 words

15 June 2022

Australian Broadcasting Corporation Transcripts

ABCTRS

English

(c) 2010 Australian Broadcasting Corporation  

 

KERRY O'BRIEN, PRESENTER: When the first microchips went into household pets to keep tabs on them, it was probably only a matter of time before some humans, somewhere, were attracted to the idea. And so it's come to pass. There's actually now a small number of people around the world with an implanted computer-like device that allows them with just a swipe of a hand to open a door or even activate a computer, just like a smartcard or an e-tag. Three states in the US have passed legislation regulating the practice and science is even starting to speculate about brain implants to enhance memory. But not everybody thinks that devices implanted into healthy humans is a good idea. Thea Dikeos reports.

 

AMAL GRAAFSTRA, IMPLANT HOBBYIST: I wanted a more convenient way that made more sense to me to get into my office.

 

THEA DIKEOS, REPORTER: IT professional Amal Graafstra describes himself as an implant hobbyist, a do-it-yourself microchipper. In 2005, he had a radio frequency identification device, or RFID, inserted into his hands. It's technology commonly used to identify dogs and cats.

 

AMAL GRAAFSTRA: Every day, after work, with the groceries in hand, I use it every day to get into the back door and it's better than fumbling around for keys.

 

THEA DIKEOS: Does it seem quite a dramatic thing to undertake just to be able to get into the house?

 

AMAL GRAAFSTRA: For some, probably. But for me, when looking, you know, I said, well, it's really just moving that RFID card from my pants pocket to a skin pocket.

 

THEA DIKEOS: Amal Graafstra has modified his device to perform functions from starting up his motorcycle to accessing his computer. The RFID emits a low level radio frequency, but the information on the chip can only by read and used by specific programmed readers.

 

MARK GASSON, RESEARCHER, UNI. OF READING: The chip I have is actually located in my hand. You can just about see it here and it's about a centimetre or so long. It's a little glass cap actual.

 

THEA DIKEOS: Mark Gasson is a researcher at the pioneering Cybernetic Intelligence Research Group at the University of Reading in the United Kingdom.

 

MARK GASSON: I use this tag for access to my laboratory at the University of Reading, so I can just swipe my hand across the plate by the door and it will grant me access. My mobile phone has a reader integrated into it, so when I'm using my mobile phone it can directly read the tag in my hand. If someone else takes my mobile phone, it just doesn't work.

 

THEA DIKEOS: It was in 2004 that microchips were first approved for human use in the United States. It's been marketed as a device linked to a medical records database so in an emergency a doctor can scan the chip and find out vital medical information.

 

Outside academic circles, it may seem like science fiction, but implant technology is already the subject of intense debate.

 

KATHERINE ALBRECHT, CASPIAN CONSUMER PRIVACY: Deep inside of every person on this globe I think there's a real concern about this technology.

 

THEA DIKEOS: American privacy campaign Katherine Albrecht.

 

KATHERINE ALBRECHT: One of the problems with implantable microchips is it actually turns you into a number in someone's database. The corporation that markets these devices has talked about doorway readers so that as you walk through a doorway you'd be automatically identified, your location would be scanned and noted. And I think that that idea that Big Brother would be observing us as we go about our daily business is very disturbing to people.

 

THEA DIKEOS: Katherine Albrecht says in the United States at least one employer has asked staff to consider taking an implant.

 

KATHERINE ALBRECHT: A lot of people are concerned: will I get to the point where instead of having to run a badge past a reader, someone might ask me to actually take an implant and run an implanted body part against the reader to get to work.

 

MARK GASSON: We're interested in looking at the risks associated with this type of simple technology.

 

THEA DIKEOS: As well as the potential privacy concerns comes the added risk of humans catching a computer virus.

 

Recently Mark Gasson made international headlines by deliberately infecting his chip under controlled conditions with a computer virus specifically designed to play havoc with the secure access system of the university building.

 

MARK GASSON: It actually reads the device, interprets the code incorrectly, corrupts the main database that controls access to the building which then stops anyone from being able to access the building.

 

THEA DIKEOS: Part of the experiment also involved assessing the psychological impact of the virus.

 

MARK GASSON: I still found it a very violating experience. This is a tag that I've had for a year. I use it for access to the building. I use it all the time. To suddenly find that not only does it not work but I'm potentially spreading a computer virus just by walking through the building is a very bizarre feeling because I can't just remove the tag.

 

THEA DIKEOS: Katherine Albrecht wants greater regulation of the technology. Three states including California have already passed legislation to regulate implant technology.

 

KATHERINE ALBRECHT: I'd like to think that the people of the world will be able to stand together in solidarity and say, "This is not our future. This is not a future that we want." And as a society that understands the risks of these kinds of technologies and the power that they would put into government hands that we would stand up together and say, "No, that's not the future that we want. We're gonna go in a different direction."

 

THEA DIKEOS: Despite the drawbacks, Mark Gasson says the benefits of implant technology have already been proven in medicine.

 

MARK GASSON: I think there's a very real danger that people understand implantable devices to be science fiction. Actually in a medical context, implantable pacemaker and cochlear implants form very intimate connections to the body.

 

THEA DIKEOS: One of the most compelling clinical applications is deep brain stimulation, which is currently performed some patients suffering Parkinson's Disease. It involves inserting electrodes in the brain to continuously stimulate one part of it, stopping debilitating tremors. The next step, according to researchers, is applying the technology to healthy people.

 

MARK GASSON: If we can have a brain implant for example which could increase your IQ or increase your memory in some way, would people be interested in having that type of technology? Now I believe they probably will.

 

THEA DIKEOS: It's not as far-fetched as it sounds given that people are already willing to insert microchips into their hands.

 

AMAL GRAAFSTRA: I think that people's interest is there. I mean, you can go on YouTube now and see just about any of - there's a tonne of people that I don't even know and have never talked to that are doing this now.

 

THEA DIKEOS: In the future others may be willing to go much further.

 

MARK GASSON: Cosmetic surgery has shown that people will undergo extremely invasive procedures for some net gain. So I think what we're likely to see is the application of this technology for enhancement.

 

KERRY O'BRIEN: That report from Thea Dikeos.

 

Document ABCTRS0020100615e66f000bj

 

 

Shaw's supermarket chain drops loyalty card, says same price available to customers without it

 

169 words

7 July 2022

04:48

Associated Press Newswires

APRS

English

(c) 2013.  The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.  

 

BOSTON (AP) - Shaw's supermarket chain is dropping the familiar loyalty store cards as it revamps its strategy and invests in its 169 stores in New England.

 

The Boston Globe reports ( https://b.globe.com/16Uok8J) that Shaw's spokesman Steven Sylven says the chain, which was recently acquired by a group of investors led by Cerberus Capital Management LP, wants to offer every customer the same price without needing a card.

 

By ending its loyalty card program, Shaw's is making itself an exception in an industry that thrives on analyzing and sometimes selling data from the loyalty cards.

 

Katherine Albrecht of Nashua, N.H., a consumer advocate who has long protested store cards as an intrusion into consumer privacy, cheered Shaw's decision to drop the loyalty card. She says consumers should be concerned about corporations gathering information about customers' food purchases.

 

------

 

Information from: The Boston Globe, https://www.bostonglobe.com

 

7

 

Document APRS000020130706e976002p5

 

Dashboard

Chipping Away at Privacy? The 'Spy Chips' Debate 

 

Jeff Morris 

570 words

1 May 2022

Intelligent Enterprise

IENT

12

905

English

Copyright (c) 2006 CMP Media LLC 

 

Introduced as a technology upgrade of the bar code and intended to help streamline supply chain operations and bolster customer loyalty, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) has become a flash point for heightened privacy concerns. As debates about surveillance and wiretapping swirl around us, it's no surprise that these tiny wonders of technology-RF-emitting computer chips smaller than a grain of sand-have been dubbed "spy chips" by some. Among the most influential are Katherine Albrecht and Liza McIntyre, whose Spychips books and Web site allege that RFID chips will be used to invade people's lives, enter their homes and snoop on their purchases and movements. 

 

Predictably, such charges have engendered an equal and opposite reaction among RFID proponents. For example, Nicholas Chavez, President of Denver-based RFID Ltd., wrote a chapter-by-chapter rebuttal of Spychips that he claims has been downloaded nearly 25,000 times. While Chavez characterizes RFID opponents as "propagandists" who deliberately use the "spy" reference as a scare tactic, he fails to note that mainstream technology publications also have been making reference to spy chips for years. Indeed, a number of U.S. states have passed bills or conducted studies to address the impact of RFID technology on consumer privacy. The European Commission recently said it was prepared to extend EC privacy legislation to cover RFID technology. Meanwhile, an executive of GS1, which administers the bar code system in Europe, said RFID and its associated technologies should be brought under the organization's existing privacy scheme, which requires retailers to post signs telling customers items are tagged, and to give customers the right to have tags switched off or destroyed at checkout. 

 

"Item-level RFID is a classic example of a technology vision getting ahead of society's ability to assimilate it," says Forrester Research senior analyst Nikki Baird, "and the industry didn't help by jumping into trials without considering the social aspects of what they were doing. So, on the one hand, the reaction is justified because industry leaders and leading-edge retailers hadn't initially set out policies around data collection, usage, sharing or protection. Public response drove them to develop those things-rightly so." 

 

Baird says none of the things critics worry about are remotely interesting to retailers, for whom preventing stockouts is the holy grail. But the privacy invasions are theoretically possible, "which means the industry can't flat out deny them-thus, the controversy lives on." 

 

Given that the slightest bit of tin foil can throw off a case-level scan in a warehouse environment that's been optimized for RFID, Baird notes that "it's really hard to imagine a scenario where Lowe's knows what kind of shoes I wear because they scanned them when I walked through their door." 

 

The state of alarm among the general public also has been low. "Consumers see near-term economic and public good benefits to some item-level RFID deployments, like tagging prescription drugs," says Forrester principal analyst Christine Overby. "Of course, this is also contingent upon companies adhering to an RFID privacy code of conduct." 

 

The bottom line is that most customers will trade information about themselves in return for something that is valuable to them. The challenge, says Baird, "is to find the right offer and to collect the right data." 

 

https://www.intelligententerprise.com

 

Document IENT000020060503e25100006

 

Consumer Group Calls For RFID Protest At Dallas Wal-Mart  

 

623 words

14 October 2021

CMP TechWeb

CMPT

English

(c) 2005 CMP Media Inc.  

 

Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering, a consumer privacy advocacy group, is calling for consumers to march on a Dallas Wal-Mart store on Saturday to protest its use of radio frequency identification technology. With protest signs in hand, privacy activist Katherine Albrecht, CASPIAN founder, will attend the march, along with Liz McIntyre, co-author of the newly published book "Spychips."  

 

For more than a year Wal-Mart has been working with suppliers such as Hewlett-Packard & Co., Procter & Gamble, and other consumer goods companies to deploy a supply chain inventory tracking system based on RFID technology. Labels with the tiny RFID chips are affixed to cases and pallets before the supplier ships the goods from its distribution center in Sanger, Texas, to one of several stores – most in the Dallas area – where Wal-Mart has installed RFID readers and equipment – most of them in the Dallas area – before the products are shipped to participating stores.  

 

The goal for Wal-Mart is to make sure that supplier merchandise, from razors and shaving cream to printers, are on the shelf instead of lost somewhere in a backroom when a customer comes looking for the item. Most suppliers participating in Wal-Mart's RFID project affix RFID labels to cases and pallets.  

 

Small items such as toothbrushes are removed from cases and stocked on the shelf. Some of the larger items, such as Hewlett-Packard printers, are shipped with RFID tags on the side of individual boxes. They are stacked on shelves at the store in the original shipping carton, along with the shipping RFID label, instead of being removed from the box.  

 

A Wal-Mart spokeswoman says the company has been open about its use of RFID. "The front entrance doors have a decal that notifies customers electronic product code tags may be in use in the store," she says. "If customers have questions, we have the pamphlets available for them. In our press release of April 30, 2004, we specifically state that HP printers and scanners will have tags on the outside packaging."  

 

"Wal-Mart does not have any RFID readers on the sales floor, as some retailers do, and neither Wal-Mart nor its suppliers will be hiding tags," she adds. "We have said all along that for those people who remain cautious of the technology, the best avenue is simply to remove the tag once you've purchased the product."  

 

"While we respect the privacy advocates and their efforts, we want to ensure customers have the complete story on how RFID will and will not be used in the retail industry," the spokeswoman says. She added: "Safety is always a top priority for us and customers should not have any concerns about shopping this weekend at our stores."  

 

Wal-Mart next week is expected to publish data from studies on RFID effectiveness conducted with help from a group of 24 consumer goods companies and technology vendors. The studies are being led by Bill Hardgrave, executive director of the Information Technology Research Center at the Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas. The research is expected to substantiate claims that RFID is "substantially" reducing the number of out-of-stock goods in Wal-Mart's RFID-enabled stores.  

 

CASPIAN's stated goal in gathering protesters at Wal-Mart's Wheatland Road store in Dallas is to raise awareness about RFID. Instructions on CASPIAN's Web site suggest those who come to protest bring signs that are legible from a distance. "Use bold, black letters that contrast with the background. Your message should be clear, concise, and easily understood at a glance. No profanity, please," the notice reads.  

 

Document CMPT000020051015e1ae0000s

 

Privacy

California Expected To Vote On RFID In Government Documents  

 

151 words

3 April 2022

Technology Daily AM

TDAM

English

Copyright 2007 by National Journal Group Inc. All rights reserved.  

 

Lawmakers in California are considering several measures that would regulate the use of radio frequency identification technology in government documents, Computerworld reports. The California Legislature is expected this month to vote on the bills, which are similar to measures vetoed last year by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger; Schwarzenegger said the regulations would limit state agencies. The legislation would put a three-year moratorium on California's use of the technology in driver's licenses and school identification cards. Katherine Albrecht, a consumer rights advocate, charged, "Government officials would love the ability to secretly identify political opponents, protesters at peace rallies or anyone else engaged in peaceable First Amendment-protected activities." Computerworld also reports that Texas Gov. Rick Perry last week signed a bill into law that allows county and court clerks in the state to post documents containing Social Security numbers online.  

 

Document TDAM000020070403e34300005

 

ALZHEIMER'S CHIP HIGH-TECH SOLUTION FOR ALZHEIMER'S PATIENTS  

 

507 words

23 May 2022

ABC News Now: Ahead of the Curve

ABCNN

English

Copyright © 2007 American Broadcasting Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  

 

XM RADIO, DOWNLOADING MUSIC, EBAY CAR SALE, NEWARK, DELAWARE  

 

SPAM, SUSANNAH FOX, PEW INTERNET & AMERICAN LIFE PROJECT  

 

GRAPHICS: SPAM SURVEY  

 

ALZHEIMER'S MICROCHIP, ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE, EMERSON MORAN, SCOTT SILVERMAN, MARY BARNES, KATHERINE ALBRECHT

 

GRAPHICS: ALZHEIMER'S CHIP  

 

DAVID KERLEY (ABC NEWS)  

 

(OC) Welcome back to 'Ahead of the Curve." Some doctors are now turning to a high-tech solution to help ease the worries of Alzheimer's patients and their families. ABC's John Berman with details.  

 

JOHN BERMAN (ABC NEWS)  

 

(VO) For the families of Alzheimer's patients, it is a nightmare scenario. Their love one get separated or lost, ends up in a hospital with no way to tell doctors who they are or what is wrong with them. It happened to Emerson Moran's wife, Pat.  

 

EMERSON MORAN (HUSBAND OF ALZHEIMER'S PATIENT)  

 

Pat was not able to tell them where it hurt, what was going on with her. She couldn't give them information about her meds, her medical history.  

 

JOHN BERMAN (ABC NEWS)  

 

(VO) And that's why this Alzheimer's center in Florida is launching a trial program to implant 200 patients with this tiny microchip.  

 

SCOTT SILVERMAN (CHAIRMAN  

 

It gets injected like having a shot of medicine in the upper right arm area by the triceps. The chip itself lies dormant. There's no power source. There's no battery. There's no energy. So nothing's going on underneath the skin.  

 

JOHN BERMAN (ABC NEWS)   

 

(VO) The chip has a 16-digit identification number. It can get scanned at a hospital and when the number is put into a database, it can provide crucial medical information.  

 

MARY BARNES (CEO  

 

Having this type of ID and having this type of technology to get the kind of assistance that they need right away is life saving because our patients are so fragile and vulnerable.  

 

JOHN BERMAN (ABC NEWS)  

 

(VO) It is the same type of chip that has been implanted in pets to help identify them when they are lost. But critics argue that humans are not pets. And privacy groups staged a vigil outside the Alzheimer's center to protest what they see as Big Brother branding.  

 

KATHERINE ALBRECHT (FOUNDER  

 

This is a very invasive procedure. And unless someone can give full consent, then it, it's really a violation of their body and their bodily integrity.  

 

JOHN BERMAN (ABC NEWS)  

 

(VO) Emerson Moran says the protesters should butt out.  

 

EMERSON MORAN (HUSBAND OF ALZHEIMER'S PATIENT)  

 

If it's your wife or if it's your mother, you want that information available to the right people.  

 

DAVID KERLEY (ABC NEWS)  

 

(OC) John Berman reporting for us. Thanks, John. And thank you for joining us. I'm David Kerley in Washington. And now you are 'Ahead of the Curve."  

 

FOR INFORMATION ON ORDERING A VIDEO OR TRANSCRIPT COPY OF ABC NEWS OR ABC NEWS NOW PROGRAMMING, PLEASE VISIT THE SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT WWW.TRANSCRIPTS.TV  

 

Document ABCNN00020070524e35n00004

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEWS

PEOPLE

 

260 words

8 March 2022

Crain's Detroit Business

CDET

0019

Volume 26; Number 10

English

(c) 2010 Crain Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.  

 

ARCHITECTURE

 

Phillip Leader to vice president and MEP group manager, SHW Group L.L.C., Berkley, from director of mechanical engineering, Albert Kahn Associates Inc., Detroit.

 

LAW

 

Valerie Brader to partner, Bodman L.L.P., Ann Arbor; also, Michelle Carter to partner, Troy; Christine Ficks to partner, Detroit; Aaron Graves to partner, Troy; and Catherine Schwedler Kokotovich to partner, Detroit, all remaining attorney.

 

Katherine Albrecht to partner, Beier Howlett P.C., Bloomfield Hills, remaining attorney in probate and estate planning group.

 

David McDaniel to partner, Jaffe, Raitte, Heuer & Weiss P.C., Southfield, remaining attorney.

 

Michelle Crockett to chair of women of legal and business network, Miller, Canfield, Paddock and Stone P.L.C., Detroit, remaining principal.

 

MANUFACTURING

 

Dennis McCardle to vice president of sales, Kolene Corp., Detroit, from general manager of sales.

 

MARKETING

 

Jane Englehart to vice president account supervisor, Ford Dealer Advertising, Farmington Hills, from account supervisor.

 

NONPROFITS

 

Kevin Sweeney to director of Midwest region, Nonprofit Finance Fund, Detroit, from independent finance consultant, Detroit.

 

Megan Thomas to executive director, Six Rivers Region Land Conservancy, Rochester, from president, Firsthand Wellness L.L.C., Birmingham.

 

Christina Schroeder Levleit to program director at the Ken and Marianna Staples Family Center, The Salvation Army of Washtenaw County, Ann Arbor, remaining co-owner, Westside Builders L.L.C., Ann Arbor.

 

SERVICES

 

Malcolm Fox to director of sustainability programs, NSF International, Ann Arbor, from vice president, Trucost North America, New York, N.Y.

 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

 

Gary Macko to general sales manager, WDIV-Channel 4, Detroit, from general sales manager, WMC-TV, Memphis, Tenn.

 

Document CDET000020100312e63800012

 

 

Trend Watch

DEL 

 

1,004 words

1 July 2022

Chain Store Age

CHSA

English

(C) 2005 Lebhar-Friedman, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 

 

We asked four retail industry experts what type of impact they think customer privacy concerns are having on retail adoption of RFID, if any. James Stafford of U.K. retailer Marks & Spencer; Jack Grasso of industry standards body EPCglobal; Martin Swerdlow of U.K. consulting firm Integrated Product Intelligence; and Katherine Albrecht of consumer advocacy group Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering (CASPIAN) all agree that customer privacy is a vital issue that all retailers must address. 

 

James Stafford, head of RFID, Marks & Spencer: Privacy is a very important issue. It's important for our customers to understand how we are using RFID, and how we aren't. It's important to communicate to allay any worries a customer might have. As we deploy any new technology, we're always mindful of the views of all stakeholders. It's our duty as users of RFID technology to explain how we're using it and demonstrate that we're taking a lead in its responsible usage. 

 

This communication has to run parallel with or slightly in advance of our use of RFID. The key message is that we only use RFID to measure in-stock levels. We don't use it for anti-theft or customer/employee monitoring. All our RFID chips will be included in detachable labels on garments that will be clearly visible to customers. If a customer chooses to remove the label, it won't affect their statutory rights.Each detachable label will have a "read only" chip that contains a unique product number, which can only be related to a specific garment through Marks & Spencer's protected computer technology. We will only scan the label where the garment is displayed on the selling floor. There is no requirement to scan the label at the POS so there is no way it can be associated with a specific customer. We will only use clearly visible handheld scanners. 

 

Marks & Spencer does not take part in any global systems that would let our information be used outside the company. Our RFID network is proprietary and closed-loop. However, we support the need for a strong policy and regulatory system to underpin the use of RFID and similar technologies. We see the benefit in supporting the development of these and sharing of best practices. 

 

Jack Grasso, director of corporate communications, EPCglobal: We don't have any evidence that privacy issues are preventing retailers or manufacturers or anyone else from developing RFID systems. I don't think retailers, manufacturers, solutions providers, hardware developers, consultants or anybody else is putting their RFID plans on the shelf because of customer privacy. Momentum is building every day with new pilots and trials being undertaken and new products being released. We have 430 members worldwide, and all are concerned about privacy. Privacy is as important as anything else we're doing. We are in the business of creating consumer value, so we're aware of how important privacy is and have been for many years. 

 

Martin Swerdlow, chief executive, Integrated Product Intelligence: Consumer privacy is a very important matter. One has to pay a lot of attention to it and there are real concerns. But if you look at the facts, the impact of consumer privacy concerns on retailers' RFID adoption doesn't exist as long as there is no association of a customer's identity with an RFID tag. If the store just sees RFID tags and doesn't identify you, you really have nothing to worry about. The Gen2 standard includes a kill command so that only deactivated tags get into the open environment. 

 

If you look at where RFID sits among potential threats to consumer privacy, it comes well behind store loyalty cards, where the retailer knows everything about you and can tie that data into numerous other databases. The same is true with credit cards, checking accounts, or any transaction conducted by means other than cash. Then along comes RFID, which by comparison looks very innocuous. Retailers are duty-bound to pay a great deal of attention to privacy concerns. Gap, Benetton, Wal-Mart and Tesco all have been picked on by CASPIAN, and retailers are getting their stories together to respond. But there are much bigger issues affecting RFID adoption, such as getting the technology right and conforming to industry standards. 

 

Katherine Albrecht, founder/ director, CASPIAN: To date, consumer privacy concerns have prevented item-level tagging. Two efforts to perform item-level tagging have been launched by Tesco, which has announced plans to expand an item-level trial involving DVDs, and by Marks & Spencer, which is talking about expanding an item-level tagging trial. We launched a boycott against Tesco and are in talks with Marks & Spencer. Retailers should look at Marks & Spencer, which did specific things in its previous trial, such as having absolutely no RFID readers in the store, as a model. 

 

Other retailers attempt to downplay the dangers, but the public is too smart and sees right through that. We're calling on retailers and CPG companies to hold off on item-level tagging until there is a better understanding of the technology and more protection in place. 

 

We launched the first shot in the RFID privacy wars in May 2003 with a boycott of Benetton. Benetton and Philips announced that 15 million ID tags would be put on women's undergarments, which didn't sound like a good idea. After three weeks of overwhelming response from the public, they canceled the trial. In summer 2003, there was a revelation that Tesco had been taking surreptitious photos of consumers taking tagged Gillette Mach 3 products from the shelf. Gillette canceled the trial and hasn't ventured into any item-level trials since. If you can't tell people what you're doing with RFID, you probably shouldn't be doing it. In the court of public opinion, honesty always wins.Dan Berthiaume, 

 

Retail Systems Alert 

 

(dberthiaume&#&64;retailsystems.com) 

 

Document CHSA000020050713e1710000j

 

 

 Tesco tests spy chip technology - Tags in packs of razor blades used to track buyers.

 

 By Alok Jha Science correspondent.

582 words

19 July 2022

The Guardian

GRDN

10

English

© Copyright 2003.  The Guardian.  All rights reserved.

 

 The supermarket chain Tesco has admitted testing controversial technology that tracks customers buying certain products through its stores. Anyone picking up Gillette Mach3 razor blades at its Cambridge store will have his or her picture taken.

 

 The Guardian, alerted by Katherine Albrecht, director of US-based Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy and Invasion and Numbering, to the use of the smart electronic tags, has found that tags in the razor blades trigger a CCTV camera when a packet is removed from the shelf. A second camera takes a picture at the checkout and security staff then compare the two images, raising the possibility that they could be used to prevent theft.

 

 "Customers know that there are CCTV cameras in the store," said a spokesman for Tesco. He went on to insist that the aim of the trial was to provide stock information and not security, but the manager of the Cambridge store, Alan Robinson, has already described how he presented photos of a shoplifter to police.

 

 The trial uses radio frequency identification (RFID) in which tiny chips can com municate with detectors up to 20ft away. The chip can then return information - anything from a unique serial number to more complex product details. Or, as in Tesco's case, it could trigger a camera.

 

 Retailers have hailed the technology as the "holy grail" of supply chain management but civil liberties groups argue that the so-called "spy chips" are an invasion of consumers' privacy and could be used as a covert surveillance device.

 

 The technology is mostly used to track batches of products through the supply chain. But manufacturers want to go a step further and tag each individual product: everything from yoghurt pots to clothes.

 

 One potential problem with RFID tags is that they can still work long after the product has been bought. If the tags become as ubiquitous as the manufacturers would like, people could be bristling with the chips in clothes and possessions. Anyone from police to potential thieves could work out exactly what they carry. Manufacturers, however, insist that the chips can be disabled at the point of sale.

 

 "You can disable the tag by erasing the data on it and this can be done at the checkout," said Jon Parsell of Bedford-based RFID Components, which supplies RFID systems to retailers.

 

 Transport for London is also using RFID-style chips in its new Oyster smart cards to allow users to travel around the tube network. The intention is that registered users will have information such as their names and addresses stored on the cards, which would eventually replace season tickets.

 

 A spokesperson for TfL said that the entry and exit points of each journey made by Oyster users were recorded and that, technically, it would be possible to track people through the tube network. Nicole Carroll, marketing director for TranSys, the consortium responsible for implementing the system, told the Guardian that all the journeys made by a user would remain stored in a central computer for the lifetime of the card.

 

 Barry Hugill of Liberty expressed concern about "function creep" - information recorded for one purpose and used for another. "We want quite clear legal guidelines as to what information companies, government agencies, local authorities are allowed to glean [and] what they can do with it," he said.

 

 The card up their sleeve, Weekend

 

 guardian.co.uk/supermarkets.

 

Document grdn000020030719dz7j0004m

 

 

Corrections

SundayBusiness; SECT3

An article on Nov. 14 about Wal-Mart's collection of data about its customers'... 

 

59 words

28 November 2021

The New York Times

NYTF

Late Edition - Final

2

English

(c) 2004 New York Times Company 

 

An article on Nov. 14 about Wal-Mart's collection of data about its customers' shopping habits misstated the surname of the founder and director of Caspian, a consumer advocacy group concerned with privacy issues. She is Katherine Albrecht, not Albright. 

 

Document NYTF000020041128e0bs0007k

 

News Briefs 

 

608 words

1 November 2021

Material Handling Management

MHEN

11

Volume 60; Issue 11; ISSN: 15294897

English

Copyright (c) 2005 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved. 

 

Hydrogenics Corp. (Mississauga, Ontario) completed fuel-cell lift truck field trials at GM of Canada's car assembly plant in Oshawa and FedEx Canada's logistics hub at the Toronto International Airport. As part of the test, Hydrogenics designed and built a refueling station that allowed the lift-truck operators to refuel, as needed, in two minutes or less. 

 

AIM Global (Warrendale, Pa.), the association for automatic identification and data capture, issued a press release rebutting the premise of a recently published book, Spychips: How Major Corporations and Government Plan to Track Your Every Move with RFID, by Katherine Albrecht and Liz Mclntyre (Nelson Current, October 2005). The association says the book is a great read for conspiracy buffs and likens it to a horror novel. "The book mostly offers up a lot of conjecture, old news, unfounded assumptions, and a hodgepodge misrepresentation of the capabilities of various types of RFED," the press release stated. 

 

JLG Industries, Inc. (McConnellsburg, Pa.) signed an agreement with Caterpillar Inc. (Peoria, 111.) to design and produce a Cat-branded telehandler product line for Caterpillar dealers. Under the terms of the 20-year strategic agreement, JLG will supply the North American and Latin American markets from its McConnellsburg, Pa facility, and European markets from facility in Belgium. 

 

A University of Arkansas study reported that Wal-Mart customers found items they wanted in stock more often due to the retailer's use radio frequency identification (RFID) technology when compared to control stores. Researchers reported a 16% reduction in out-of-stocks. Tagged out-of-stock items were also replenished three tunes faster than comparable items using bar code technology. The 29-week study analyzed out-of-stock merchandise at 12 pilot stores equipped with RFID technology and 12 control stores without the technology. 

 

Dell Inc. (Round Rock, Tex.) opened its third, and largest, U.S. manufacturing plant in Winston-Salem, N.C. The new, 750,000 sq.-ft., $100 million plant, will build Dell's OptiPlex and Dimension desktop systems. 

 

RedPrairie Corp. (Waukesha, Wis.), a provider of supply-chain software, acquired RangeGate Mobile Solutions to expand the company's product offerings. Based in the U.K., RangeGate provides software and mobile solutions for managing visibility, compliance and execution in warehouses and stores. 

 

Kardex Systems, Inc. (Marietta, Ohio), maker of automated vertical storage carousels and lifts, opened a new manufacturing facility in Lewiston, Pa. The new factory features a new powder coat paint system. 

 

The North American Material Handling & Logistics Show and Conference (NA 2006) heads for Cleveland March 27-30,2006. The event, sponsored by Material Handling Industry of America (MHIA), will feature more than 400 material handling product vendors and service providers. 

 

The office supply retailer Staples Inc. (Brighton, Mass.) announced plans to build a $40-million distribution and fulfillment center on 45 acres in the Beloit (Wis.) Gateway Business Park. The 450,000-sq.-ft. facility is scheduled to open next fall and will employ 200 people. 

 

Railex LLC (Riverhead, N.Y.) will spend $18 million to build a 200,000-sq.-ft. East Coast hub in Rotterdam, N. Y. Railex supplies fresh produce to grocery retailers. The company plans to process two, 55-car trains of fresh produce per week from the West Coast into its new facility, the equivalent of 400 truckloads of produce. 

 

Michaels Stores Inc. (Irving, Texas) announced plans to build a 715,000 sq.-ft. distribution center in an industrial park in Centralia, Wash. Tarragon Development (Seattle, Wash.) will manage the development project. Michaels owns and operates 889 arts and craft supply stores in 48 states and Canada. 

 

Copyright Penton Media, Inc. Nov 2005

 

Document MHEN000020051207e1b100002

 

 

Startpage Australia Launches

 

289 words

5 June 2022

Manufacturing Close-Up

MFGCLU

English

(c) 2010. Close-Up Media, Inc. All rights reserved.  

 

Startpage by Ixquick, a supplier of private Internet search, announced the launch of Startpage Australia, a region-specific version of the Startpage.com search engine.

 

According to a release, as a meta-search engine, Startpage allows users to anonymously search nine other search engines at once and receive the best results privately. Startpage does not record user IP addresses or use tracking cookies.

 

Startpage VP of Marketing and Media Relations Katherine Albrecht will visit Australia through June 9 to meet with Australian privacy advocates and speak with government officials.

 

"The serious problems of Internet censorship and personal data collection in Australia are issues of worldwide concern. We are reaching out to help with the launch of Startpage AU," said Ixquick CEO Robert Beens. "We want to extend a warm welcome to the people of Australia, and invite them to use the Startpage search engine as a tool to protect their privacy and anonymity."

 

The move comes as Australians have grown alarmed at government controls and incursions into their use of the Internet. A leaked blacklist of government censored websites last year caused a firestorm of controversy, and last month Google released figures showing that the Australian government submitted more than 150 requests for user data to Google in a recent six-month period.

 

Startpage provides secure SSL encryption and offers a proxy service that allows users to anonymously visit the sites they find through the Startpage search engine.

 

Startpage is the English-language version of Ixquick, a search engine that is third-party certified not to record users' IP addresses or make a record of their searches.

 

The website is at Startpage.com/au.

 

((Comments on this story may be sent to newsdesk@closeupmedia.com))

 

Document MFGCLU0020100626e6650005h

 

 

Startpage Australia Debuts

 

289 words

4 June 2022

Professional Services Close-Up

PSVCLU

English

(c) 2010. Close-Up Media, Inc. All rights reserved.  

 

Startpage by Ixquick, a provider of private Internet search, announced the launch of Startpage Australia, a region-specific version of the Startpage.com search engine.

 

According to a release, as a meta-search engine, Startpage allows users to anonymously search nine other search engines at once and receive the best results privately. Startpage does not record user IP addresses or use tracking cookies.

 

Startpage VP of Marketing and Media Relations Katherine Albrecht will visit Australia through June 9 to meet with Australian privacy advocates and speak with government officials.

 

"The serious problems of Internet censorship and personal data collection in Australia are issues of worldwide concern. We are reaching out to help with the launch of Startpage AU," said Ixquick CEO Robert Beens. "We want to extend a warm welcome to the people of Australia, and invite them to use the Startpage search engine as a tool to protect their privacy and anonymity."

 

The move comes as Australians have grown alarmed at government controls and incursions into their use of the Internet. A leaked blacklist of government censored websites last year caused a firestorm of controversy, and last month Google released figures showing that the Australian government submitted more than 150 requests for user data to Google in a recent six-month period.

 

Startpage provides secure SSL encryption and offers a proxy service that allows users to anonymously visit the sites they find through the Startpage search engine.

 

Startpage is the English-language version of Ixquick, a search engine that is third-party certified not to record users' IP addresses or make a record of their searches.

 

The website is at Startpage.com/au.

 

((Comments on this story may be sent to newsdesk@closeupmedia.com))

 

Document PSVCLU0020100604e6640000p

 

 State of Mind: The Psychology Of Control Goes Viral

Infowars, 02:23, 22 July 2013, 674 words, Alex Jones Speaks, (English)

State Of Mind: The Psychology Of Control, from the creators of A Noble Lie: Oklahoma City 1995, is now going viral.

But let’s make State of Mind even more viral!

Document WC56576020130722e97l0000e

 

Chip ahoy.(VeriChip Corporation)(Brief article) 

 

173 words

5 June 2022

Food Chemical News

FCNW

3

ISSN: 0015-6337; Volume 48; Issue 17

English

Copyright 2006 Gale Group Inc. All rights reserved. 

 

CHIP AHOY: Scott Silverman, board chairman of VeriChip Corporation, has proposed implanting the company's RFID tags in immigrant and guest workers entering the United States. Interviewed on the "Fox & Friends" television show last month, he cited the Bush administration's call to know "who is in our country and why they are here." He proposed using VeriChip RFID implants to register workers at the border, and then verify their identities in the workplace, adding, "We have talked to many people in Washington about using it." 

 

"Makers of VeriChip have been planning for this day," commented privacy advocate Katherine Albrecht, author of the book Spychips. "They've lost millions of dollars trying to sell their invasive product to North America, and now they see an opportunity in the desperation of the people of Latin America." Albrecht and co-author Liz McIntyre warned that a government-sanctioned chipping program for immigrants could be quickly expanded to include U.S. citizens as well. 

 

COPYRIGHT 2006 Agra Informa, Inc.

 

Document FCNW000020060627e26500005

 

 

People & Players

The Player: Privacy activist Albrecht tackles marketers head on 

 

JACK NEFF 

793 words

19 April 2022

Advertising Age

ADVAGE

54

Volume 75; Number 16

English

(c) 2004 Crain Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 

 

On one side in the debate over marketing uses of Radio Frequency ID chips is the multi-trillion-dollar global package goods and retail complex. Leading the other side is a Harvard doctoral student in consumer psychology and her all-volunteer organization. 

 

So far, it's been no contest. The doctoral student keeps winning round after round. 

 

In the past year, Katherine Albrecht, founder of Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering (Caspian), has helped scuttle RFID tests and unearth embarrassing internal documents from technology backers, making her presence felt from Bentonville to Berlin. She publicizes each industry faux pas on Caspian's site, Spychips.org, often getting the message into news outlets across the globe in 24 hours. Her efforts have helped get two of the world's biggest retailers to publicly disavow plans to use RFID chips on packages or consumer loyalty cards. 

 

Wal-Mart Stores last year said it decided against trying RFID chips on individual products-at least for now-the same week Ms. Albrecht publicized a trove of devious-sounding ``communication-strategy'' documents left unprotected on the Web site of the Auto-ID Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, developer of the RFID technology. The files outlined plans to downplay privacy issues despite research showing widespread consumer concern. 

 

going global 

 

In January, Ms. Albrecht took her act global. As she organized protests of RFID plans by Germany's Metro, she persuaded management to give her one of the chain's loyalty cards. In it, she discovered a hidden RFID chip, which, combined with chips on packages, could help Metro track every item a shopper purchases. After she publicized the find, Metro recalled thousands of the cards and vowed to stop embedding chips in new ones. 

 

The same month, the Grocery Manufacturers Association stubbed its toe trying to dig up data on Ms. Albrecht. The group apologized to her after an intern assigned to request a ``biography'' mistakenly copied the activist on an e-mail to her GMA boss. The e-mail read: ``I don't know what to tell this woman! `Well, actually we're trying to see if you have a juicy past that we could use against you.''' 

 

GMA spokesman Richard Martin said the e-mail was genuine. He admitted that he wonders ``how someone who's had such a small operation has been able to get her voice heard in ways the industry hasn't been able to.'' He attributes her success to ``exaggeration,'' though he declined to provide specifics. ``Tales of conspiracy theory make interesting press,'' he said. ``Unfortunately, they don't mesh with reality. ... We're committed to rolling out [RFID] in a responsible fashion, with a real focus on protecting consumer privacy.'' 

 

The hunt for Ms. Albrecht's ``juicy past'' may not have advanced that message. But it's hard to blame GMA for being curious. She's unlike activists it's used to fighting. The former teacher, working on her doctoral thesis in consumer psychology, describes herself as a ``free-market libertarian.'' She doesn't want legislation or regulation. She just wants marketers to stop collecting individual consumer purchase data, because she says consumers don't want it collected. 

 

She won't disclose her age or precisely how she makes a living. She is, after all, a privacy advocate. But she says she has held some part-time jobs in addition to her academic and Caspian work, adding: ``My husband would probably like to know how I plan to make a living with that Harvard doctorate, too.'' 

 

Ms. Albrecht points to studies from the 1960s through 1990s showing business majors scoring lowest in ratings of academic ethics among undergraduates, with marketing majors scoring among the lowest within business disciplines in one 1998 study. 

 

She asks: ``Are these really people we want to entrust with our personal data?'' 

 

RÚsumÚ 

 

Name: Katherine Albrecht

 

Who: The Harvard doctoral student is working on her dissertation in consumer psychology when she's not working unpaid to uncover and stop use of RFID technology on products. 

 

Challenge: Prevent retailers and marketers from using RFID chips on products - or get them to voluntarily disclose when they do and remove or disable them before they leave stores. While she's won PR battles, she fears she may lose the war, because growing supply-chain use of RFID will make it less expensive to use on consumer products. 

 

Now: Founder of Caspian-Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering-and foremost opponent of marketing uses of data from Radio Frequency ID chips, which can store and transmit data on each individual consumer product and who bought it. 

 

Photo Caption: Katherine Albrecht Photo Credit: Andreas Sterzing 

 

Document ADVAGE0020040421e04j0000t

 

SPEND TRENDS EXECUTIVE TECHNOLOGY/GARTNER RETAIL IT AND BUSINESS PRIORITIES SURVEY. 

 

60 words

1 January 2022

Executive Technology

EXETEC

1

English

Copyright 2004 Fairchild Publications, Inc. All Rights Reserved  

 

POS WARS 

 

New entrants are exerting major pressure on the Big Four POS makers 

 

SABER-RATTLING 

 

Consumer advocate Katherine Albrecht speaks out against loyalty cards and RFID 

 

APPAREL QUOTA COUNTDOWN 

 

Retailers are readying their systems and supply chains for the end of quotas in 2005 

 

And business priorities survey. 

 

Document EXETEC0020040116e01100001

 

 

Business

SECURITY FLAW DERAILS AN ONLINE CVS SERVICE ; PURCHASE-TRACKING SITE COMPROMISED 

 

Hiawatha Bray, Globe Staff 

403 words

22 June 2022

The Boston Globe

BSTNGB

THIRD

D3

English

© 2005 New York Times Company.  Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning.  All Rights Reserved.  

 

CVS Corp., the drugstore chain based in Woonsocket, R.I., shut down one of its Internet services after a privacy advocate discovered a security flaw that could leak embarrassing information about its customers. 

 

"We kind of took advantage of a little security loophole they had on their website," said Katherine Albrecht, founder of Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering. 

 

The CVS site included a feature for people whose employers offer "flexible spending accounts." This benefit lets workers set aside some untaxed income to pay for special needs, including nonprescription pharmacy supplies. Workers must provide purchase data to their employers to be reimbursed. 

 

To make the process easier, CVS let customers sign up for a service that would track all their purchases that were eligible for reimbursement. For each purchase, the customer would swipe a CVS ExtraCare card, which allowed CVS to track everything the customer bought. This information was stored in a database, and the customer could have a copy of the data sent to him via e-mail. 

 

But Albrecht found she could access anybody's records by obtaining a CVS card number, the person's ZIP code, and the first three letters of his or her last name. Albrecht could then have the data sent to her own e-mail address. Since ExtraCare cards are often attached to key chains, Albrecht said, it would be easy for someone to steal a number. 

 

Albrecht worked with others to test the system, and found she was able to identify when and where people bought such sensitive items as condoms and pregnancy test kits. "CVS has got some very intimate information about their customers," Albrecht said. 

 

CVS shut down the flexible spending system when informed of the security breach. 

 

Eileen Howard Dunn, vice president of corporate communications, said CVS has issued about 50 million ExtraCare cards, but that only a small fraction of cardholders use the flexible spending account service. Dunn said the database did not include information that could be used in an identity theft, such as financial data or Social Security numbers. 

 

She said there have been no reports that any data were stolen. 

 

Dunn said the service will resume once the company upgrades its security procedures. 

 

Hiawatha Bray can be reached at bray@globe.com. 

 

SIDEBAR:CVSPLEASE REFER TO MICROFILM FOR CHART DATA. 

 

Document BSTNGB0020050622e16m0001g

 

 

Business

RFID WITH PRIVACY IN MIND 

 

MARK BAARD 

420 words

24 July 2022

The Boston Globe

BSTNGB

THIRD

D2

English

© 2006 New York Times Company.  Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning.  All Rights Reserved.  

 

If you have trouble grasping the following scenario, kindly consult your nearest Philip K. Dick-inspired paranoid: Retailers are planning to turn our blue jeans into tracking beacons by replacing bar-code labels with radio frequency identification tags stitched into the garments. Each RFID tag has a unique electronic product code that will be matched with its owner's personal information in a massive global database. The one world government will then track the tags and us with hidden reader devices capable of scanning the RFID tags (or "arfids") at distances up to 30 feet. 

 

This is the dark vision of Biblical literalists such as Katherine Albrecht, a consumer privacy advocate with a doctoral degree from Harvard, who speaks at Bible prophecy conferences and has coauthored a book titled "The Spychips Threat: Why Christians Should Resist RFID and Electronic Surveillance." 

 

RFID industry execs insist the tags are meant only to improve inventory tracking, fight counterfeiting, and speed product recalls and returns. 

 

Consumers, they say, will enjoy cost savings and improved personal safety and better health as a result. But Albrecht's message about the arfid privacy threat has stuck, and the American Civil Liberties Union and Electronic Frontier Foundation consider her an ally. So many companies are scrambling to come up with technologies to make the tags less vulnerable to electronic snooping, or "skimming." 

 

Under one "secure RFID" proposal from a Danish company, RFIDsec ( www.rfidsec.com ), consumers will be able to control whether their tags' radio signals can be picked up by reader devices. Unlike proposed tag killing machines (which permanently disable RFID tags) or IBM's new clipped tag (which has a tear-off antenna), RFIDsec's secure RFID chip and its antenna would remain intact, even after the consumer "programs" the tag to be undetectable by reader devices. 

 

Consumers will still be able to kill arfids with secure RFID chips. But they will also be able to acquire authentication codes they can use to switch the tags into a privacy mode at checkout, and then back to a fully active mode (with the tag's electronic product code again fully readable) if they choose to return the item. 

 

How exactly the secure RFID chip will work is unclear. To me, the whole thing sounds awfully complicated. But the effort shows just how eager the industry appears to be to keep RFID tags on, and active, after checkout. 

 

PERSONAL TECH PROTOTYPE HE CAN BE REACHED AT MARK@BAARD.COM

 

Document BSTNGB0020060724e27o0003x

 

RFID Firm Turns To Google For Pro-RFID Campaign 

 

703 words

1 November 2021

CMP TechWeb

CMPT

English

(c) 2005 CMP Media Inc. 

 

Companies trying to influence public opinion once shelled out big bucks for full-page advertisements in major newspapers, but today they may be as likely to spend those dollars on sponsored links on Google. 

 

One such case in point is RFID Ltd., a pro-RFID industry firm that is paying Google an undisclosed sum to publish several papers on the search engine that paint an upbeat picture of all-things having to do with RFID technology. More specifically, the papers are intended to refute allegations detailed in a recently released book called "Spychips," which paints a less than friendly view of how radio frequency identification technology is affecting consumer privacy. The authors -- Katherine Albrecht, founder of the privacy advocacy group Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering (CASPIAN), and consumer privacy advocate Liz McIntyre -- co-authored the book released on Oct. 4. 

 

"This is terrifying stuff. Companies have laid out some outlandish plans for RFID technology and no one knows about them, so when you're sitting on information you feel a responsibility to tell people," Albrecht said. 

 

"Spychips" tries to explain RFID technology -- its history and future -- along with strategies by businesses and government to imbed the technology in everything from postage stamps to shoes to people, and spy on Americans without knowledge or consent. It also urgently encourages consumers to take action to protect their privacy and civil liberties. 

 

Obviously, RFID Ltd., which decribes itself on its web site as a system integrator and RFID consulting business, holds a dramatically different opinion than that of the book authors. Indeed, RFID Ltd. is prepared to financially invest "as much as it takes" to publish several papers on RFID technology, said Nicholas Chavez, president at RFID Ltd. He views the group's escalating their opinion campaign on Google as representing "the evolution of information warfare." 

 

"There are people that disagree on a fundamental level to what these authors have written," he said. 

 

The Google advertising campaign is part of RFID Ltd.'s drive to inform consumers, media and investors about what Chavez call the truth of ultra high frequency RFID technology. There's no change for the documents that intended to explain the effects of RFID technology on consumer privacy. The document is scheduled for release on Friday. Web surfers will find it by typing into the search bar one of several keywords such as "RFID investing," "RFID," "RFID Spychips," and "Spychips," each word or phrase costs something different and is associated with a different advertising campaign that could last for weeks. 

 

The RFID market is growing. Research firm Frost & Sullivan estimates RFID technology revenue will exceed $7 billion by 2008. While there is some debate, a generally accepted definition of RFID technologies can be found in TechEncyclopedia, which defines RFID as "a wireless data collection technology that uses electronic tags for storing data. Like bar codes, they are used to identify items. Unlike bar codes, which must be brought close to the scanner for reading, RFID tags are read when they are within the proximity of a transmitted radio signal." 

 

Google was Chavez's obvious choice for the counter attack. RFID Ltd. needed to go to the source where people acquire information about RFID to provide them with "accurate and credible information that comes from engineers." Google reaches more than 80 percent of the Internet Web users that search for information on RFID, he said. 

 

Since Google isn't an actual portal where color ads are posted, advertisers must purchase advertising as a sponsor whose name and link appear on the right side of a Web page after a keyword is searched on. The sponsored links are priced per click through, about 100,000 would cost about $40,000, Chavez said. 

 

Customers buying the advertising set their own price by limiting the number of times you can click-through to the content. Once that limit is reached the link disappears, Chavez said. "You can spend X number of dollars daily and it can get into the millions of dollars monthly," he said. "We are not entirely sure how much this will cost us but we're prepared to do what it takes." 

 

Document CMPT000020051102e1b100006

 

 

Groups raise privacy concerns over plans for RFID 

 

William Jackson, GCN Staff 

502 words

7 April 2022

Newsbytes News Network

NBYT

English

(c) 2004  Newsbytes News Network 

 

United States, 2004 Apr 07 (NB). The Defense Department is trying to ensure that the radio-frequency ID technology that suppliers must begin using on large shipments next year will be interoperable with systems used in the private sector—and that has raised some concerns among privacy advocates. 

 

Although the military logistics program itself does not threaten individual privacy, Katherine Albrecht, director of CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering), called the mandate worrisome, because it is pushing the potentially invasive technology at a critical point in its development. 

 

Privacy organizations worry that small, identifiable tags on consumer goods could let businesses track and gather data on individuals. These databases also could be made available to government. 

 

“The only thing that is preventing that from happening now is that it is not yet efficient enough,” Albrecht said. 

 

One of DOD’s goals is to drive industry to improve the functionality, cost effectiveness and interoperability of RFID. 

 

“I see the application in the defense community as breaking through some of these barriers,” said Michael Wynne, acting undersecretary for acquisition, technology and logistics. 

 

Wynne was speaking at the RFID Industry Summit in Washington, where DOD officials met with supply chain representatives and technology vendors to discuss specifics of the DOD program. Final acquisition and technical requirements will not be available until this summer, but all DOD orders made after Oct. 1 for delivery after Jan. 1 will have to be tagged with a radio-readable device to identify goods at the pallet and case level. 

 

A position statement by a coalition of advocacy groups, including CASPIAN and the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, lists this type of supply chain management as one of the acceptable uses for RFID, along with tracking of pharmaceuticals and toxic substances. 

 

“At the pallet and case level I don’t have a concern,” said Beth Givens, director of the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse. “It’s a useful tool,” as long as the technology is not pushed to individual consumer items. 

 

But that is one of the things DOD already is experimenting with. In an effort to improve supply chain management and enable just-in-time logistics, the Defense Logistics Agency wants to be able to track some goods to their point of consumption, where items are issued to personnel. Plans are being made to test such a point-of-sale type system with the Army in South Korea, Wynne said. 

 

Givens said she is concerned that the technology is being implemented without any public discussion or assessment of the technology or its societal impact. 

 

“I question the rush to use the technology,” she said. “I wonder if DOD isn’t jumping in too soon. I think it has been overhyped.” 

 

But DOD officials say they want to get in on RFID early in the adoption curve, so that they can have a hand in guiding the development of the technology. 

 

Reported By GCN Daily Updates,  https://www.gcn.com

 

Document NBYT000020040407e047000p2

 

 

Groups raise privacy concerns over plans for RFID 

 

William Jackson, GCN Staff 

502 words

7 April 2022

Newsbytes News Network

NBYT

English

(c) 2004  Newsbytes News Network 

 

United States, 2004 Apr 07 (NB). The Defense Department is trying to ensure that the radio-frequency ID technology that suppliers must begin using on large shipments next year will be interoperable with systems used in the private sector—and that has raised some concerns among privacy advocates. 

 

Although the military logistics program itself does not threaten individual privacy, Katherine Albrecht, director of CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering), called the mandate worrisome, because it is pushing the potentially invasive technology at a critical point in its development. 

 

Privacy organizations worry that small, identifiable tags on consumer goods could let businesses track and gather data on individuals. These databases also could be made available to government. 

 

“The only thing that is preventing that from happening now is that it is not yet efficient enough,” Albrecht said. 

 

One of DOD’s goals is to drive industry to improve the functionality, cost effectiveness and interoperability of RFID. 

 

“I see the application in the defense community as breaking through some of these barriers,” said Michael Wynne, acting undersecretary for acquisition, technology and logistics. 

 

Wynne was speaking at the RFID Industry Summit in Washington, where DOD officials met with supply chain representatives and technology vendors to discuss specifics of the DOD program. Final acquisition and technical requirements will not be available until this summer, but all DOD orders made after Oct. 1 for delivery after Jan. 1 will have to be tagged with a radio-readable device to identify goods at the pallet and case level. 

 

A position statement by a coalition of advocacy groups, including CASPIAN and the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, lists this type of supply chain management as one of the acceptable uses for RFID, along with tracking of pharmaceuticals and toxic substances. 

 

“At the pallet and case level I don’t have a concern,” said Beth Givens, director of the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse. “It’s a useful tool,” as long as the technology is not pushed to individual consumer items. 

 

But that is one of the things DOD already is experimenting with. In an effort to improve supply chain management and enable just-in-time logistics, the Defense Logistics Agency wants to be able to track some goods to their point of consumption, where items are issued to personnel. Plans are being made to test such a point-of-sale type system with the Army in South Korea, Wynne said. 

 

Givens said she is concerned that the technology is being implemented without any public discussion or assessment of the technology or its societal impact. 

 

“I question the rush to use the technology,” she said. “I wonder if DOD isn’t jumping in too soon. I think it has been overhyped.” 

 

But DOD officials say they want to get in on RFID early in the adoption curve, so that they can have a hand in guiding the development of the technology. 

 

Reported By GCN Daily Updates,  https://www.gcn.com

 

Document NBYT000020050527e047003lh

 

 

IN DEPTH

NATIONAL

NSA REVELATIONS REFRAME DIGITAL LIFE FOR SOME

 

Oskar Garcia  

1,207 words

23 July 2022

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

PPGZ

PITTSBURGH PRESS

A-8

English

© 2013 Post Gazette Publishing Company.  Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning.  All rights reserved.  

 

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, a college student encrypts chats and emails, saying he's not planning anything sinister but shouldn't have to sweat snoopers. And in Canada, a lawyer is rethinking the data products he uses to ensure his clients' privacy.

 

As the attorney, Chris Bushong, put it: "Who wants to feel like they're being watched?"

 

News of the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs that targeted phone records but also information transmitted on the Internet has done more than spark a debate about privacy. Some are reviewing and changing their online habits as they reconsider some basic questions about today's interconnected world. Among them: How much should I share and how should I share it?

 

Some say they want to take preventative measures in case such programs are expanded. Others are looking to send a message - not just to the U.S. government but to the Internet companies that collect so much personal information.

 

"We all think that nobody's interested in us, we're all simple folk," said Doan Moran of Alexandria, La. "But you start looking at the numbers and the phone records ... it makes you really hesitate."

 

Last month former government contractor Edward Snowden leaked documents revealing that the National Security Agency, as part of its anti-terrorism efforts, had collected the phone records of millions of Americans. A second NSA program called PRISM forces major Internet firms to turn over the detailed contents of communications such as emails, video chats, pictures and more.

 

Ms. Moran's husband, an ex-Army man, already was guarded about using social media. Now she is looking through her Facebook "friends" to consider whom to delete, because she can't know what someone in her network might do in the future. Ms. Moran said she's uneasy because she feels unclear about what the NSA is keeping and how deep the agency's interests might go.

 

In Toronto, attorney Bushong let a free trial of Google's business applications expire after learning about PRISM, under which the NSA seized data from Google, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook and AOL. Mr. Bushong is moving to San Diego in August to launch a tax planning firm and said he wants to be able to promise confidentiality and respond sufficiently should clients question his firm's data security.

 

He switched to a Canadian Internet service provider for email and is considering installing his own document servers.

 

"I'd like to be able to say that I've taken all reasonable steps to ensure that they're not giving up any freedoms unnecessarily," he said.

 

Across the Internet, computer users are talking about changes small and large - from strengthening passwords and considering encryption to ditching cellphones and using cash over credit cards. The conversations play out daily on Reddit, Twitter and other networks, and have spread to offline life with so-called "Cryptoparty" gatherings in cities including Dallas, Atlanta and Oakland, Calif.

 

Information technology professional Josh Scott hosts a monthly Cryptoparty in Dallas to show people how to operate online more privately.

 

"You have to decide how extreme you want to be," Mr. Scott said.

 

Christopher Shoup, a college student from Victorville, Calif., has been encouraging friends to converse on Cryptocat, a private messaging program that promises users they can chat "without revealing messages to a third party." Mr. Shoup isn't worried that his own behavior could draw scrutiny, but said the mere idea that the government could retrieve his personal communications "bothers me as an American."

 

"I don't think I should have to worry," he said.

 

Cryptocat said it nearly doubled its number of users in two days after Mr. Snowden revealed himself as the source of leaks about the NSA's programs.

 

Two search engine companies billed as alternatives to Google, Bing and Yahoo are also reporting significant surges in use.

 

DuckDuckGo and Ixquick both promise they don't collect data from users or filter results based on previous history. DuckDuckGo went from 1.8 million searches per day to more than 3 million per day the week after the NSA revelations came to light. Ixquick and sister site Startpage have gone from 2.8 million searches per day to more than 4 million.

 

Gabriel Weinberg, chief executive of DuckDuckGo, said the NSA programs reminded people to consider privacy but that government snooping may the least of an everyday computer user's concerns. DuckDuckGo's website warns of the pitfalls of Internet search engines, including third-party advertisements built around a user's searches or the potential for a hacker or rogue employee to gain access to personal information.

 

Potential harm is "becoming more tangible over time," said Mr. Weinberg, who is posting fewer family photos, dropping a popular cloud service that stores files and checking his settings on devices at home to ensure they are as private as possible.

 

At Ixquick, more than 45,000 people have asked to be beta testers for a new email service featuring accounts that not even the company can get into without user codes, spokeswoman Katherine Albrecht said.

 

The company will levy a small charge for the accounts, betting that people are willing to pay for privacy. As computer users grow more savvy, they better understand that Internet companies build their businesses around data collection, Ms. Albrecht said.

 

"These companies are not search engines," she said. "They are brilliant market research companies. ... And you are the product."

 

Representatives for Google, Yahoo and PalTalk, companies named in a classified PowerPoint presentation leaked by Mr. Snowden, declined comment. Microsoft, Apple and AOL officials did not return messages. Previously, the companies issued statements emphasizing that they aren't voluntarily handing over user data to the government.

 

They also rejected newspaper reports indicating that PRISM had opened a door for the agency to tap directly into companies' data centers whenever the government pleases.

 

"Press reports that suggest that Google is providing open-ended access to our users' data are false, period," Google CEO Larry Page said in a blog post.

 

It's not clear whether big Internet companies have seen changes in how their products are used. An analysis released this month by comScore Inc. said Google sites accounted for two-thirds of Internet searches in June - about 427 million queries per day.

 

PHOTO 2; Caption: PHOTO: LM Otero/Associated Press photos: Above - Information  technology professional Josh Scott, left, helps a computer user who  did not want to be identified during a monthly "Cryptoparty" in  Dallas. Across the Internet, users are talking about changes small  and large, from using more encryption and stronger passwords to  much more extreme measures such as ditching cellphones and using  cash over credit cards. The conversations play out daily on Reddit,  Twitter and other networks, and have spread to offline life with  so-called Cryptoparty gatherings in cities including Dallas,  Atlanta and Oakland, Calif.  PHOTO: Below - Kyle Maxwell, center, left,  talks with Michelle Klinger, right, during a monthly "Cryptoparty"  in Dallas.  

 

Document PPGZ000020130801e97n00008

 

 

An eye on the shopping trolley spy.

 

By SIMON LONDON.

1,104 words

30 September 2022

Financial Times (FT.Com)

FTCOM

English

(c) 2003 The Financial Times Limited. All rights reserved

 

There is so much momentum now that I don't see anything slowing us down," says Kevin Ashton, director of the AutoID Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "I'm on record as saying we will have 20bn tags deployed by 2007 and 1 trillion by 2010. I see no reason to change that."

 

It is the kind of talk that makes Katherine Albrecht shiver. Mr Ashton's dream - a world in which everything from tubes of toothpaste to shoes to cars carries a unique microchip identification tag - is her nightmare.

 

"Remember what happened under Stalin," she says over lunch of gazpacho soup and Spanish omelette. "Whatever Kevin Ashton says, in the end this technology will be used for surveillance. They will be able to tell who you are, where you are and who you are with. It scares me."

 

Ms Albrecht is committed to not only slowing but, if possible, halting the widespread deployment of what she calls "spy chips".

 

It is a campaign that has pitted her not only against Mr Ashton but also big companies including Wal-Mart, Tesco and Gillette. They believe microchip tags could help reduce theft, increase supply chain efficiency and save billions of dollars without eroding privacy.

 

Until this year, the war of words was phony. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tag technology was too primitive and the cost per tag too high to be used outside a few specialist applications. While RFID tags were used to track containers on cargo ships, for example, attaching billions of tags to individual consumer items was science fiction.

 

But work by scientists at MIT, Cambridge University and a handful of start-up companies means that fiction is fast becoming fact. Tags comprising a tiny silicon chip and antenna can be manufactured for less than 50 cents; if the price keeps falling it will soon be economic to plant a tag on every consumer product.

 

Scan the chip with a "reader" - a gadget that sends out a high-frequency radio signal - and it beams back a unique serial number. That number points to a web page that contains detailed specifications for the product.

 

Importantly, tag readers can scan dozens of items simultaneously and do not need direct line of sight. This, plus the unique serial number, makes RFID tags potentially a big advance over bar codes.

 

In Ms Albrecht's view, these features also make RFID tags a potential threat to civil liberties.

 

The stakes were raised in January, when Gillette ordered 500m tags for use in the first large-scale test of RFID technology. The razors and batteries group is tagging a range of products that pass through one of its main distribution facilities to find cost savings and efficiencies.

 

In July, Wal-Mart, the world's biggest retailer, said it would require its top 100 suppliers to use RFID tags on pallets and cartons by the end of next year. Small suppliers having a further two years to fall into line.

 

The US Department of Defence is considering a similar move, mandating the use of RFID tags throughout its massive supply chain.

 

These developments explain Mr Ashton's confidence. The biggest names in the public and private sectors are now serious about adopting RFID technology.

 

Moreover, they are converging on standards developed by the Auto-ID Center that specify the radio frequencies to be used by readers and the format of serial numbers carried by the tags.

 

Standardisation across the retail and consumer goods industries should encourage faster adoption. Rapid adoption should, in turn, result in higher volumes for tag manufacturers and lower unit costs. The result could be a virtuous circle that sees RFID technology spread quickly around the world.

 

Yet Ms Albrecht has been there every step of the way - protesting, issuing statements and building links with like-minded civil libertarians. When the Auto-ID Center launched its Electronic Product Code technology standard in Chicago this month, she organised a small but vocal protest.

 

Her persistence is certainly raising questions in the minds of potential users.

 

While Wal-Mart is pushing ahead with RFID in its warehouses, for example, plans to trial "smart shelves" in stores have been dropped. Privacy concerns? Or simple economics at a time when the price of RFID tags remains too high to be used profitably on low-value consumer goods?

 

The company remains coy. Tesco, the UK supermarket group, and its German counterpart Metro are continuing field tests involving tagging items on store shelves.

 

"Our advice to clients is this: concentrate on the supply chain first, let people get used to the idea and have the discussion about privacy. When the technology is more mature start to introduce it on individual products. The way this is presented [to customers] will be very important," says Glover Ferguson, chief scientist at Accenture, the consulting firm.

 

In his sparsely furnished, modern office on the fringes of MIT's campus, Mr Ashton does not deny that privacy is a legitimate concern.

 

"I've been trying to get our membership to take the privacy issue seriously - with some success, actually," says the Englishman, who came to MIT four years ago on secondment from Procter &Gamble.

 

In the best P&G tradition, the Auto-ID Center has conducted focus groups with consumers across countries and continents. The results were conclusive: most consumers had never heard of RFID tags but regarded the technology with suspicion and wanted reassurance.

 

The centre's preferred solution is rules that would make it mandatory to inform consumers when RFID tags are present, offer them the facility to turn off or "kill" tags, and offer control over how information collected from tags could be used.

 

Does that mean that Mr Ashton favours legislation?

 

"I'm in favour of whatever works," he replies. "The test should not be whether it is legislation or not. The test should be whether it provides the right protections."

 

Ms Albrecht, meanwhile, wants a one-year moratorium on RFID deployments while these issues are debated. Says Mr Ashton: "These are real concerns but I don't think they will be big enough to derail us. I've got faith in the results of the focus groups. This isn't a really big issue if we handle it well."

 

Companies everywhere will be hoping he is right. The fate of genetically modified foods in Europe is a reminder that clever technologies can be stopped in their tracks by lack of trust on the part of consumers. If it could happen to "Frankenstein foods" it could happen to "spy chips".

 

Document FTCOM00020031001dz9u00033

 

 NSA Leaks About Spying Are Scaring Some Americans Away From The Internet

BuzzFlash, 17:21, 22 July 2013, 1694 words, OSKAR GARCIA, (English)

Follow:

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, ...

Document WC49524020130724e97m0000t

 

 NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

KAUZ, 18:29, 22 July 2013, 1424 words, Michelle Obama, (English)

Officials say George Zimmerman helped rescue four people from an overturned vehicle last week, just days after he was cleared of all charges in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

Document WC63101020130723e97m0000s

 

 NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

KMSB-TV, 17:26, 22 July 2013, 1177 words, OSKAR GARCIA, (English)

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, a ...

Document WC45589020130722e97m00008

 

 NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

WPEC NEWS 12, 17:26, 22 July 2013, 1178 words, OSKAR GARCIA, (English)

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, a ...

Document WC49089020130722e97m00004

 

 NSA surveillance scandal: Revelations changing digital life for some

Oregon Live, 05:40, 23 July 2013, 1181 words, The Associated Press, (English)

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government inquiry. In California, a ...

Document WCPOR00020130722e97m000xd

 

 NSA surveillance prompts some users to change online habits

Denver Post, 00:57, 23 July 2013, 1179 words, Oskar Garcia, (English)

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, a ...

Document WCDNVR0020130722e97m001bc

 

 NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

WKRG, 17:29, 22 July 2013, 1195 words, OSKAR GARCIA, (English)

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, a ...

Document WC49915020130722e97m0000b

 

 NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

KIMA TV, 15:00, 22 July 2013, 1177 words, OSKAR GARCIA, (English)

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, a ...

Document WC47190020130723e97m0000y

 

 NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

KTBC, 17:29, 22 July 2013, 1195 words, OSKAR GARCIA, (English)

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, a ...

Document WC63094020130723e97m0000h

 

 NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

KCAU-TV, 18:29, 22 July 2013, 1196 words, OSKAR GARCIA, (English)

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, a ...

Document WC45440020130722e97m0000l

 

 NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

Belleville View, 17:26, 22 July 2013, 1179 words, OSKAR GARCIA, (English)

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, a ...

Document WC47155020130722e97m00001

 

 NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

ABC 33/40, 17:29, 22 July 2013, 1196 words, OSKAR GARCIA, (English)

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, a ...

Document WC42267020130722e97m0001k

 

 NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

Peninsula Daily News, 17:26, 22 July 2013, 1217 words, OSKAR GARCIA, (English)

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, a ...

Document WC44103020130722e97m0000h

 

 NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

The County Press, 17:26, 22 July 2013, 1178 words, OSKAR GARCIA, (English)

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, a ...

Document WC44770020130722e97m0000d

 

 NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

WHDH-TV, 23:48, 22 July 2013, 1178 words, OSKAR GARCIA, (English)

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, a ...

Document WC49055020130722e97m000rx

 

 NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

WAVE 3, 18:29, 22 July 2013, 1196 words, OSKAR GARCIA, (English)

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe. In California, a ...

Document WC47192020130722e97m0000a

 

 NSA revelations reframe digital life for some

PhysOrg.com, 15:00, 22 July 2013, 1399 words, Oskar Garcia, (English)

In this Thursday, July 18, 2013, photo, information technology professional Josh Scott looks up at a visual he uses while hosting a monthly "Cryptoparty" in Dallas. Across the Internet, users are talking about changes small and large, from ...

Document WC92602020130723e97m0001z

 

OnLine

Online habits undergoing seismic shift in wake of U.S. spying revelations

 

Oskar Garcia  

1,219 words

22 July 2022

Postmedia Breaking News

CWNS

English

Copyright © 2013 Canwest News Service  

 

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances.

 

She's worried that an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe.

 

In California, a college student encrypts chats and emails, saying he's not planning anything sinister but shouldn't have to sweat snoopers.

 

And in Canada, a lawyer is rethinking the data products he uses to ensure his clients' privacy.

 

As Toronto lawyer Chris Bushong, put it: "Who wants to feel like they're being watched?"

 

BASIC QUESTIONS REOPENED

 

News of the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs that targeted phone records but also information transmitted on the Internet has done more than spark a debate about privacy.

 

Some are reviewing and changing their online habits as they reconsider some basic questions about today's interconnected world.

 

Among them: How much should I share and how should I share it?

 

Some say they want to take preventive measures in case such programs are expanded.

 

Others are looking to send a message - not just to the U.S. government but to the Internet companies that collect so much personal information.

 

CAUSE FOR HESITATION

 

"We all think that nobody's interested in us, we're all simple folk," said Doan Moran of Alexandria, La.

 

"But you start looking at the numbers and the phone records ... it makes you really hesitate."

 

Last month former government contractor Edward Snowden leaked documents revealing that the National Security Agency, as part of its anti-terrorism efforts, had collected the phone records of millions of Americans.

 

A second NSA program called PRISM forces major Internet firms to turn over the detailed contents of communications such as emails, video chats, pictures and more.

 

Moran's husband, an ex-Army man, already was guarded about using social media.

 

FILTERING HER 'FRIENDS'

 

Now she is looking through her Facebook "friends" to consider whom to delete, because she can't know what someone in her network might do in the future.

 

Moran said she's uneasy because she feels unclear about what the NSA is keeping and how deep the agency's interests might go.

 

In Toronto, Bushong let a free trial of Google's business applications expire after learning about PRISM, under which the NSA seized data from Google, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook and AOL.

 

Bushong is moving to San Diego in August to launch a tax planning firm and said he wants to be able to promise confidentiality and respond sufficiently should clients question his firm's data security.

 

He switched to a Canadian Internet service provider for email and is considering installing his own document servers.

 

CHANGES SMALL AND LARGE

 

"I'd like to be able to say that I've taken all reasonable steps to ensure that they're not giving up any freedoms unnecessarily," he said.

 

Across the Internet, computer users are talking about changes small and large - from strengthening passwords and considering encryption to ditching cellphones and using cash over credit cards.

 

The conversations play out daily on Reddit, Twitter and other networks, and have spread to offline life with so-called "Cryptoparty" gatherings in cities including Dallas, Atlanta and Oakland, Calif.

 

Information technology professional Josh Scott hosts a monthly Cryptoparty in Dallas to show people how to operate online more privately.

 

"You have to decide how extreme you want to be," Scott said.

 

THE CRYPTOCAT OPTION

 

Christopher Shoup, a college student from Victorville, Calif., has been encouraging friends to converse on Cryptocat, a private messaging program that promises users they can chat "without revealing messages to a third party."

 

Shoup isn't worried that his own behaviour could draw scrutiny, but said the mere idea that the government could retrieve his personal communications "bothers me as an American."

 

"I don't think I should have to worry," he said.

 

Cryptocat said it nearly doubled its number of users in two days after Snowden revealed himself as the source of leaks about the NSA's programs.

 

ALTERNATIVE SEARCH ENGINES

 

Two search engine companies billed as alternatives to Google, Bing and Yahoo, are also reporting significant surges in use.

 

DuckDuckGo and Ixquick both promise they don't collect data from users or filter results based on previous history.

 

DuckDuckGo went from 1.8 million searches per day to more than three million per day the week after the NSA revelations came to light.

 

Ixquick and sister site Startpage have gone from 2.8 million searches per day to more than four million.

 

LEAST OF THE CONCERNS?

 

Gabriel Weinberg, chief executive of DuckDuckGo, said the NSA programs reminded people to consider privacy - but that government snooping may the least of an everyday computer user's concerns.

 

DuckDuckGo's website warns of the pitfalls of Internet search engines, including third-party advertisements built around a user's searches or the potential for a hacker or rogue employee to gain access to personal information.

 

Potential harm is "becoming more tangible over time," said Weinberg, who is posting fewer family photos, dropping a popular cloud service that stores files and checking his settings on devices at home to ensure they are as private as possible.

 

'YOU ARE THE PRODUCT'

 

At Ixquick, more than 45,000 people have asked to be beta testers for a new email service featuring accounts that not even the company can get into without user codes, spokeswoman Katherine Albrecht said.

 

The company will levy a small charge for the accounts, betting that people are willing to pay for privacy.

 

As computer users grow more savvy, they better understand that Internet companies build their businesses around data collection, Albrecht said.

 

"These companies are not search engines," she said. "They are brilliant market research companies. ... And you are the product."

 

Representatives for Google, Yahoo and PalTalk, companies named in a classified PowerPoint presentation leaked by Snowden, declined comment.

 

Microsoft, Apple and AOL officials did not return messages.

 

COMPANIES REJECT REPORTS

 

Previously, the companies issued statements emphasizing that they aren't voluntarily handing over user data to the government.

 

They also rejected newspaper reports indicating that PRISM had opened a door for the agency to tap directly into companies' data centres whenever the government pleases.

 

"Press reports that suggest that Google is providing open-ended access to our users' data are false, period," Google CEO Larry Page said in a blog post.

 

It's not clear whether big Internet companies have seen changes in how their products are used.

 

An analysis released this month by comScore Inc. said Google sites accounted for two-thirds of Internet searches in June - about 427 million queries per day.

 

STARTING OVER FROM SCRATCH

 

In Tokyo, American expat Peng Zhong responded to the spying news by swapping everything from his default search engine and web browser to his computer's operating system.

 

Zhong, an interface designer, then built a website to help others switch, too.

 

Called prism-break.org, the site got more than 200,000 hits in less than a week after Zhong announced it on social networks.

 

Since then, Zhong said, he's seen numerous people talking online about their own experiences in changing their computing habits.

 

"It's a start," he said.

 

© Copyright (c) The Province

 

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